Taming the Dragon

Effective Use of Dragon Naturally Speaking Speech Recognition Software as an Avenue to Universal Access

Authors

  • James Altman University of Nevada, Las Vegas

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/wap.v5i2.333

Keywords:

speech recognition, voice recognition, disability, universal design, pedagogy, tutoring, classroom, workplace

Abstract

This article examines the usefulness of voice recognition software both inside and outside the classroom. In particular, the program Dragon Naturally Speaking is considered. Relevant research is presented along with the author’s own experiences as a long time user of voice recognition software and those of students as well. Methods for overcoming drawbacks, such as training the software and correcting errors, are detailed. Means for maximizing the software’s effectiveness for note taking, freewriting, and revising are detailed, and points are made about the desirability of use of voice recognition software for universal access.

Author Biography

James Altman, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

James Altman, B.S., M.A. is a Ph.d. candidate in Literature and part-time instructor in the department of English of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He will complete his Ph.d. work on Robert Frost in may 2014. He currently teaches World Literature. He has previously taught composition. He is a Lifetime member of The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi.

Published

2014-02-04

How to Cite

Altman, J. (2014). Taming the Dragon: Effective Use of Dragon Naturally Speaking Speech Recognition Software as an Avenue to Universal Access. Writing and Pedagogy, 5(2), 333–348. https://doi.org/10.1558/wap.v5i2.333

Issue

Section

Reflections on Practice