https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIRCD/issue/feed Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders 2022-04-06T13:34:53+00:00 Elizabeth Spencer liz.spencer@newcastle.edu.au Open Journal Systems <p>The <em>Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders</em> provides a unique forum for qualitative research relating to the ways in which disorders impact on communication and interaction. The interactions include e.g., every day, therapeutic, and educational interactions in home, institutional, organizational, private, and public settings. The disorders include in principle any, e.g., speech and language, communicative, visual, physical, cognitive, and mental disorders. JIRCD also accepts studies in contextual issues involved in these interactions. It includes quantitative studies in social interaction. </p> https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIRCD/article/view/19193 Interaction within a dance class for adults with intellectual disabilities 2021-06-13T18:10:33+00:00 Caitlin Slaney cslaney@csu.edu.au Catherine Easton ceaston@csu.edu.au <p>Background: Environmental factors have a significant role in facilitating and limiting participation of individuals with intellectual disabilities in everyday activities. Creating accessible communication environments within leisure activities offers opportunities for enhanced participation and interaction.</p> <p>Method: An ethnographic approach was used to observe and analyze interactions within a dance class for adults with intellectual disabilities. Observation was used alongside questionnaires, interviews, and assessment tools to identify and analyze patterns of interaction among the students and professionals.</p> <p>Results: Participation in the dance class enabled the students to build social connections with each other, which in turn further facilitated interaction and joint participation. Professionals and students implemented a range of communication strategies in response to their aims and expectations. Through participation in the study, the teacher’s awareness of her use of strategies increased.</p> <p>Discussion and conclusion: Further research is needed to understand how interaction opportunities can be further maximized during everyday activities for individuals with intellectual disabilities.</p> 2022-04-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIRCD/article/view/20235 ‘Where does Granny live?’ The role of test questions in conversational remembering between mothers and their children with developmental language disorder 2021-06-17T08:59:59+00:00 Lucy Hughes lucy.hughes@ucl.ac.uk Juliette Corrin j.corrin@ucl.ac.uk Caroline Newton caroline.newton@ucl.ac.uk Wendy Best w.best@ucl.ac.uk <p>Background: Parent–child conversations form the primary context for language acquisition. This article investigates the role of test questions (TQs) in shaping turn construction opportunities for children with language disorder during conversational remembering with their mothers.</p> <p>Method: Video-recorded data from two mother–child dyads were evaluated using conversation analysis (CA). A recently proposed framework was used to examine TQ sequences initiated and developed from both a knowing and unknowing epistemic stance.</p> <p>Results: Our findings suggest that turn-taking and turn construction opportunities for the child are shaped by: congruity of mother’s epistemic stance within and across turns; positioning of mother’s remembering as shared, joint, or collaborative; availability of language elements in mother’s turn for the child’s next turn construction; and mother’s expectation of competence display by the child in their following turn.</p> <p>Discussion and conclusion: Our data reveal the potential of CA to inform understanding of TQ patterns and interventions which support parents in the refinement of conversation skills to help children with language disorder.</p> 2022-04-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIRCD/article/view/21310 Introduction to section on dementia 2021-11-03T10:37:54+00:00 Boyd H Davis bdavis@uncc.edu Margaret Maclagan margaret.maclagan@canterbury.ac.nz Charlene Pope cpope@equinoxpub.com Birte Bös birte.boes@uni-due.de Carolin Schneider c.schneider@uu.nl Sonja Kleinke sonja.kleinke@as.uni-heidelberg.de <p>.</p> 2022-04-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIRCD/article/view/22571 Digital outreach in online dementia discourse 2022-03-17T23:20:19+00:00 Boyd H Davis bdavis@uncc.edu Margaret Maclagan margaret.maclagan@canterbury.ac.nz Charlene Pope cpope@equinoxpub.com <p>Introduction: The rapid online expansion of social media can decrease social isolation for both caregivers and persons with dementia (PWD) through the digital communities they create.</p> <p>Background: PWD and their caregivers are increasingly turning to social media to express their own concerns and offer advice to each other.</p> <p>Material analyzed: Multimodal methods were used to analyze three online sites – two caregiver sites and one site for PWD. The sites are StoryCall, a video archive recorded by South Carolina caregivers about caring for US veterans with dementia; Molly and Joey, a video series of Joey’s interactions with his mother Molly, who had Lewy body dementia; and Dementia Diaries, oral diaries transcribed by volunteers.</p> <p>Results: The topics discussed online by people who wish to advise caregivers often differ from the issues and topics that most concern or interest caregivers. Persons with dementia openly shared that they still wished to live as well as possible and wanted to be seen as real people.</p> <p>Implications and conclusions: Through social media, PWD remind themselves and others that they are more than their condition; similarly, caregivers of PWD educate themselves and others through sharing experiences and asking questions.</p> 2022-04-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIRCD/article/view/20391 ‘Typing with dementia’ 2021-06-20T17:37:53+00:00 Birte Bös birte.boes@uni-due.de Carolin Schneider carolin.schneider@uni-due.de <p>Background: While there is a substantial amount of pragmatic research on online health discourse, social media contexts actively involving persons living with dementia have been largely neglected so far. This study, which is rooted in the social-constructionist paradigm, explores processes of self-positioning on a public message board for persons living with dementia provided by a non-profit health organization.</p> <p>Method: The study is based on a pilot corpus of 15 sample threads on the public message board, and it investigates the referencing and predication practices employed by the members of this virtual community of practice.</p> <p>Results: Their interactions reveal processes of identity construction which clearly debunk the popular myth of ‘loss of self’ in dementia.</p> <p>Conclusion: Going beyond the categories, characteristics, and activities conventionally ascribed to persons living with dementia, participants challenge dementia-related stereotypes and ultimately contribute to a more multifaceted picture of living with dementia.</p> 2022-04-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIRCD/article/view/20401 Constructing dementia in discourse 2021-07-08T14:10:40+00:00 Sonja Kleinke sonja.kleinke@as.uni-heidelberg.de <p>Introduction: Research on the discursive construction and representation of dementia has mainly focused on often problematic public mainstream discourses in which persons living with dementia (PWD) and their family care partners (FCPs) usually do not get a voice. This study aims to highlight differences between public mainstream and FCPs’ discourses, in order to provide a more differentiated picture based on detailed linguistic analysis.</p> <p>Method: The study analyzes FCPs’ discursive construction of PWD and their own role in the caring process in forum interaction in Talking Point, a public support platform managed by the Alzheimer’s Society (UK). The study applies a combination of categories well established in qualitative (Critical) Discourse Analysis, namely, semantic topoi and the so far less often utilized semantic category of clusivity.</p> <p>Results: The study reveals that FCPs, although resorting to some of the problematic mainstream discourses, exploit a more finely grained range of lifeward-oriented alternative discourses contesting dominating mainstream discourses.</p> 2022-04-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIRCD/article/view/22554 Qualitative Research in Communication Disorders: An Introduction for Students and Clinicians Edited by R. Lyons and L. McAllister (2019) 2022-03-17T11:15:46+00:00 Jytte Isaksen jisa@sdu.dk <p>Qualitative Research in Communication Disorders: An Introduction for Students and Clinicians Edited by R. Lyons and L. McAllister (2019) Guildford: J &amp; R Press, xxviii + 529pp.</p> 2022-04-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIRCD/article/view/22558 Learning from the Talk of Persons with Dementia: A Practical Guide to Interaction and Interactional Research Edited by T. Stickle (2020) 2022-03-17T11:25:30+00:00 Lars-Christer Hydén lars-christer.hyden@liu.se <p>Learning from the Talk of Persons with Dementia: A Practical Guide to Interaction and Interactional Research Edited by T. Stickle (2020) Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, xix + 255pp.</p> 2022-04-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIRCD/article/view/22563 Pathologist of the Mind: Adolf Meyer and the Origins of American Psychiatry By S. D. Lamb (2014) 2022-03-17T11:48:01+00:00 Judith Felson Duchan duchan@buffalo.edu <p>Pathologist of the Mind: Adolf Meyer and the Origins of American Psychiatry By S. D. Lamb (2014) Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, xii + 299pp.</p> 2022-04-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd.