‘It all fits into place’

Psychiatrists’ linguistic strategies in challenging media representations of their profession

Authors

  • Chris McVittie Queen Margaret University
  • Andy McKinlay The University of Edinburgh

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/japl.v8i1.71

Keywords:

discourse analysis, linguistic strategies, constructing reality, media representations, professional identity, psychiatry

Author Biographies

Chris McVittie, Queen Margaret University

Chris McVittie received his PhD in psychology at the University of Edinburgh and is currently Professor of Social Psychology, in the School of Arts, Social Sciences & Management, Queen Margaret University, where he teaches social psychology, health psychology and qualitative research methods. He has researched and published widely on topics that include discourse and identities, social inclusion and the negotiation of health issues. He is co author (with Andy McKinlay) of Social Psychology and Discourse, published in 2008 and Identities in Context: Individuals and Discourse in Action, published in 2011, both by Wiley-Blackwell.

Andy McKinlay, The University of Edinburgh

Andy McKinlay received his PhD in philosophy and psychology at the University of St Andrews and is currently Professor of Social Psychology and Head of the School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences at the University of Edinburgh, where he teaches discourse analysis and social psychology. His research interests lie in the areas of identity and discourse. He is co-author (with Chris McVittie) of Social Psychology and Discourse, published in 2008 and of Identities in Context: Individuals and Discourse in Action, published in 2011, both by Wiley-Blackwell.

References

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Published

2013-07-19

How to Cite

McVittie, C., & McKinlay, A. (2013). ‘It all fits into place’: Psychiatrists’ linguistic strategies in challenging media representations of their profession. Journal of Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice, 8(1), 71–88. https://doi.org/10.1558/japl.v8i1.71

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Section

Articles