Collaborative Work and Medical Talk: Opportunities for Learning Through Knowledge Sharing

Authors

  • Line Lundvoll Nilsen University Hospital of North Norway, Norwegian Centre for Integrated Care and Telemedicine
  • Sten R. Ludvigsen InterMedia, University of Oslo

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/cam.v7i2.143

Keywords:

Collaborative work, , medical talk, knowledge sharing, learning, treatment regiments, teleconsultation

Abstract

Teleconsultations provide new opportunities for learning in medical settings. This study explores the conditions under which learning can take place. The empirical context is 47 real-time videoconferences carried out to examine collaborative work and the medical talk involved. Sixteen of the observations were consultations wherein general practitioners (GPs) and specialists shared knowledge with the purpose of solving a medical problem related to a patient under treatment. Eight interviews were done face-to-face with a focus on the content in talk, with the purpose of examining our findings from the observations. The learning opportunities could be seen as what medical practitioners achieve through interaction and working with patients over periods of time. The analysis of medical talk in consultations shows that collaborative work among GPs and specialists creates a shared understanding of the patient’s clinical history and treatment regiments. As knowledge is demanded and attributed, consultations create a work tool that expands the medical work and talk. Collaborative work in and between levels of health care service expands knowledge, creates opportunities for learning in everyday settings, and improves the quality of knowledge in the health care system.

Author Biographies

Line Lundvoll Nilsen, University Hospital of North Norway, Norwegian Centre for Integrated Care and Telemedicine

Line Lundvoll Nilsen is a PhD candidate at the Department of Education, University of Tromsø.

Sten R. Ludvigsen, InterMedia, University of Oslo

Sten R. Ludvigsen is a Professor at InterMedia, University of Oslo. He received his PhD based on a study of learning in medical institutions. He is educated in educational sciences and has specialized in research about how to use digital resources and the relationship between co-located and distributed settings in the educational sector and the workplace setting.

Published

2011-04-01

How to Cite

Nilsen, L. L., & Ludvigsen, S. R. (2011). Collaborative Work and Medical Talk: Opportunities for Learning Through Knowledge Sharing. Communication and Medicine, 7(2), 143–153. https://doi.org/10.1558/cam.v7i2.143

Issue

Section

Articles