How the Bible Feels

The Christian Bible as Effective and Affective Object

Authors

  • Dorina Miller Parmenter Spalding University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/post.32589

Keywords:

Bible, materiality, bullet in a Bible, affect

Abstract

Despite Christian leaders’ insistence that what is important about the Bible are the messages of the text, throughout Christian history the Bible as a material object, engaged by the senses, frequently has been perceived to be an effective object able to protect its users from bodily harm. This paper explores several examples where Christians view their Bibles as protective shields, and will situate those interpretations within the history of the material uses of the Bible. It will also explore how recent studies in affect theory might add to the understanding of what is communicated through sensory engagement with the Bible.

Author Biography

Dorina Miller Parmenter, Spalding University

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, School of Liberal Studies, Spalding University

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Published

2017-08-19

How to Cite

Parmenter, D. M. (2017). How the Bible Feels: The Christian Bible as Effective and Affective Object. Postscripts: The Journal of Sacred Texts, Cultural Histories, and Contemporary Contexts, 8(1-2), 27-37. https://doi.org/10.1558/post.32589

Issue

Section

Special Issue Articles