Speculative Naturalism: A Bleak Theology in Light of the Tragic

Authors

  • Leon Niemoczynski Immaculata University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/jsrnc.v8i2.236

Keywords:

metaphysical naturalism, German idealism, process philosophy

Abstract

Theological perspective upon the relationship between deity and creature may not be as radically open to a full range of possible value as has once been thought. If one is seeking a capacious view of deity, creatures, and nature, I contend that not only should one account for continuity, wholeness, healing, salvation, warmth, benevolence, and joy in one’s religious metaphysics, but also for discontinuity, difference, diremption, rupture, trauma, tragedy, melancholy, coldness, and the more somber tones of the divine life. My exploration of this darker side of religious naturalism, a ‘bleak theology’ or ‘speculative naturalism’, as I am calling it, begins by articulating its opposite in the axiologically positive evaluation of nature and deity found within the mainstream of American religious naturalism. I then offer some speculative theses from the bleak or speculative naturalist perspective and argue why this darker side of religious naturalism ought to be accounted for.

Author Biography

Leon Niemoczynski, Immaculata University

Dr. Leon Niemoczynski Department of Philosophy Immaculata University Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

References

Cooper, John W. 2006. Panentheism: The Other God of the Philosophers (Grand Rapids: Baker Academic).

Corrington, R. 1987. ‘Toward a Transformation of Neoclassical Theism’, International Philosophical Quarterly 24.108: 393-408. Doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5840/ipq198727425.

———. 1992. Nature and Spirit: An Essay in Ecstatic Naturalism (New York: Fordham University Press).

———. 1993. ‘Peirce the Melancholy Prestidigitator’, Semiotica 94: 85-101.

———. 1996. Nature’s Self: Our Journey from Origin to Spirit (Lanham: Rowman & Little

Published

2014-08-28

How to Cite

Niemoczynski, L. (2014). Speculative Naturalism: A Bleak Theology in Light of the Tragic. Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture, 8(2), 236–253. https://doi.org/10.1558/jsrnc.v8i2.236