Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSRNC <p><em>The Journal of Religion, Nature and Culture, </em>which has been published quarterly since 2007<em>,</em> explores through the social and natural sciences the complex relationships among human beings, their diverse 'religions' (broadly and diversely defined) and the earth's living systems, while providing a venue for analysis and debate over what constitutes an ethically appropriate relationship between our own species and the environments we inhabit. <a href="https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSRNC/about">Read more.</a></p> en-US <p>© Equinox Publishing Ltd.</p> <p>For information regarding our Open Access policy, <a title="Open access policy." href="Full%20details of our conditions related to copyright can be found by clicking here.">click here</a>.</p> amnichols@ucsb.edu (Amanda Nichols) aparkin@equinoxpub.com (Ailsa Parkin) Wed, 14 Dec 2022 00:00:00 +0000 OJS 3.3.0.11 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Sarah D. Wald, David J. Vazquez, Priscilla Solis Ybarra, Sarah Jaquette Ray, Eds., Latinx Environmentalisms: Place, Justice, and the Decolonial https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSRNC/article/view/20490 <p>Sarah D. Wald, David J. Vazquez, Priscilla Solis Ybarra, Sarah Jaquette Ray, Eds., Latinx Environmentalisms: Place, Justice, and the Decolonial (Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 2019), 366 pp., $115.50 (hbk), ISBN: 9781439916674.</p> Neomi De Anda, Cristina Dominguez Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSRNC/article/view/20490 Fri, 21 Oct 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Michael D. McNally, Defend the Sacred: Native American Religious Freedom Beyond the First Amendment https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSRNC/article/view/20651 <p>Michael D. McNally, Defend the Sacred: Native American Religious Freedom Beyond the First Amendment (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2020), 400 pp., $99.95 (hbk), ISBN: 9780691190891.</p> Matthew Glass Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSRNC/article/view/20651 Fri, 21 Oct 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Heuser, Andreas & Jens Koehrsen (eds). Does Religion Make a Difference? Religious NGOs in International Development Collaboration https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSRNC/article/view/21013 <p>Heuser, Andreas &amp; Jens Koehrsen (eds). Does Religion Make a Difference? Religious NGOs in International Development Collaboration (Baden-Baden, Germany: Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft, 2020), 364pp., $89 (pbk), ISBN: 9783848767069.</p> Randolph Haluza-DeLay Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSRNC/article/view/21013 Fri, 21 Oct 2022 00:00:00 +0000 The Redemption of Matter https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSRNC/article/view/23069 <p style="font-weight: 400;">Despite her biographical proximity to figures such as Emerson and Thoreau, the nineteenth-century writer and editor Margaret Fuller is not often considered an environmentalist. Indeed, she is more often remembered for her contributions to political feminism than to environmentalism. I argue that in Fuller’s writing, however, an environmental ethics emerges in conjunction with her questioning of the binary between ‘matter’ and ‘spirit’. In place of this binary, Fuller proposed fluidity. This is evidenced in her first book, Summer on the Lakes, a literary travelogue chronicling Fuller’s journey through the West. With recourse to theoretical concerns in feminist new materialisms, I first demonstrate how her understanding of fluidity was influenced by the nineteenth-century vitalist theory of animal<br />magnetism. I then turn to the ways that Fuller takes her encounters with the West’s watery sites—its waterfalls, rivers, and lakes—as occasions to articulate an anticolonial environmental ethics.</p> Michael Putnam Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSRNC/article/view/23069 Wed, 14 Dec 2022 00:00:00 +0000 ‘Dash me with Amorous Wet, I can Repay You’ https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSRNC/article/view/22963 <p>Walt Whitman’s poetry is famously full of ‘self’ and self-contradicting: ‘Do I contradict myself? / Very well then I contradict myself, / (I am large, I contain multitudes.)’ The scholarly attention to paradox and contradiction often takes the form of an attention to various ‘binaries’ in Whitman’s prose and poetry; well-trod binaries include body-soul, sacred-profane, nature-culture, and woman-man. However, a queer attention to the poetic construction of such binaries reveals them to be fluid and ultimately non-binary. Whitman and his speakers construct binaries that relate to religion, gender, and nature, but in poeticizing the construction of binary logic (e.g., man-woman), Whitman and his speakers reveal such purportedly self-contained and discrete domains to be open, fluid, and co-constituting. Recognizing the poetic performance of ‘binary’ logic will reshape reader’s understanding of ethical and political implications of Whitman’s queerly relational nature ethics.</p> Caleb Murray Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSRNC/article/view/22963 Fri, 21 Oct 2022 00:00:00 +0000 The Watery Depths of American Environmentalism https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSRNC/article/view/22947 <p>Legacies of American environmentalism are grounded in androcentric and heteronormative narratives that have downplayed significant contributions by women. A re-narration of American Environmentalism detailed through the lives and work of three pioneering women, Marjory Stoneman Douglas, Rachel Carson, and Sylvia Earle, provides a new focal perspective on environmental ethics via a deeper, aqua-centric lens, or what we call a ‘water ethic’. For all three women, their work was informed by deep scientific knowledge of, and sense of felt connection to, their local aquatic environments. They understood humans as part of the interconnected biological ecosystem and drew early connections between local environmental processes and broader planetary systems. Their individual lived experiences enabled them to see the world in a ‘queer’ way, which was markedly different than many of their contemporaries. Analyzing gender and gender nonconformity can help us to understand the importance of a water ethic for a rapidly changing planet.</p> Amanda M Nichols, Whitney A Bauman Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSRNC/article/view/22947 Tue, 20 Sep 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Introduction to the Special Issue https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSRNC/article/view/24004 Karla Armbruster Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSRNC/article/view/24004 Fri, 23 Sep 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Ambiguous Legacies, Contested Futures https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSRNC/article/view/24220 Rebecca Kneale Gould, Russell C Powell Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSRNC/article/view/24220 Mon, 31 Oct 2022 00:00:00 +0000