Thematic Variation and Key Relationships

Charlotte's Theme in Max Steiner's Score for Now, Voyager

Authors

  • Charles Leinberger University of Texas at El Paso

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/jfm.v1i1.63

Keywords:

Max Steiner, <i>Now, Voyager</i>, late 19th century Romantic musical style, sound-film technology

Abstract

Austrian-born composer Max Steiner (1888-1971), who moved to Hollywood, California, in 1929, played an important role in bringing to American movies a musical style inspired by the works of late nineteenth-century romantic composers. Coming to Hollywood in the early days of sound film made him one of the first composers to combine the techniques of nineteenth-century German- Austrian composition with twentieth-century sound-film technology. Although this discussion will focus on many of the rhythmic and harmonic variations that Steiner uses, the author intends to demonstrate how these themes and their subsequent variations are used to create unity throughout the score.

Author Biography

Charles Leinberger, University of Texas at El Paso

Charles Leinberger is Assistant Professor in Music Theory and Composition at the University of Texas at El Paso. An active trumpet player, his dissertation is entitled, An Austrian in Hollywood: Leitmotifs, Thematic Transformation & Key Relationships in Max Steiner’s 1942 Film Score “Now, Voyager.”

References

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Published

2009-06-19

How to Cite

Leinberger, C. (2009). Thematic Variation and Key Relationships: Charlotte’s Theme in Max Steiner’s Score for Now, Voyager. Journal of Film Music, 1(1), 63–77. https://doi.org/10.1558/jfm.v1i1.63

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Section

Articles