Should We Define Our Categories? On Jennifer Larson’s <i>Understanding Greek Religion</i>

Authors

  • Nickolas P. Roubekas University of Vienna

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/jch.36261

Keywords:

cognitive science of religion, Greek history

Abstract

.

Author Biography

Nickolas P. Roubekas, University of Vienna

Nickolas P. Roubekas is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Vienna. He is the author of An Ancient Theory of Religion: Euhemerism from Antiquity to the Present (Routledge, 2017) and editor of Theorizing 'Religion' in Antiquity ((Equinox, forthcoming 2019).

References

Barton, C. A., and D. Boyarin. 2016. Imagine No Religion: How Modern Abstractions Hide Ancient Realities. New York: Fordham University Press. https://doi.org/10.2307/j.ctt1dfnt8f

Jensen, J. S. 2014. What is Religion? London and New York: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315729466

Larson, J. 2016. Understanding Greek Religion. Abingdon and New York: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315647012

Nongbri, B. 2008. “Dislodging ‘Embedded’ Religion: A Brief Note on a Scholarly Trope”. Numen 55(4): 440–60. https://doi.org/10.1163/156852708X310527

Nongbri, B. 2013. Before Religion: A History of a Modern Concept. New Haven, CT and London: Yale University Press. https://doi.org/10.12987/yale/9780300154160.001.0001

Roubekas, N. P. 2015. “Belief in Belief and Divine Kingship in Early Ptolemaic Egypt: The Case of Ptolemy II Philadelphus and Arsinoe II”. Religio: Revue pro religionistiku 23(1): 3–23. http://hdl.handle.net/11222.digilib/134551

Sheedy, M. 2017. “Of Elephants and Riders: Cognition, Reason, and Will in the Study of Religion”. In Theory in a Time of Excess: Beyond Reflection and Explanation in Religious Studies Scholarship, ed. A. W. Hughes, 121–28. Sheffield, UK and Bristol, CT: Equinox.

Tweed, T. 2006. Crossing and Dwelling: A Theory of Religion. Cambridge, MA and London: Harvard University Press. https://doi.org/10.4159/9780674044517

White, C. 2017. “What the Cognitive Science of Religion Is (and Is Not)”. In Theory in a Time of Excess: Beyond Reflection and Explanation in Religious Studies Scholarship, ed. A. W. Hughes, 95–114. Sheffield, UK and Bristol, CT: Equinox.

Whitmarsh, T. 2014. “Atheistic Aesthetics: The Sisyphus Fragment, Poetics and the Creativity of Drama”. Proceedings of the Cambridge Philological Society 60: 109–126. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1750270514000062

Published

2018-12-04

How to Cite

Roubekas, N. P. (2018). Should We Define Our Categories? On Jennifer Larson’s &lt;i&gt;Understanding Greek Religion&lt;/i&gt;. Journal of Cognitive Historiography, 4(1), 42–46. https://doi.org/10.1558/jch.36261

Issue

Section

Book Review Symposium: Jennifer Larson's 'Understanding Greek Religion' (2016)