Cognitive Historiography

Religion as an Artifact of Culture and Cognition.

Authors

  • William McCorkle Masaryk University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/jch.v1i2.25883

Keywords:

human cognition, theory and method, history

Abstract

Introduction to JCH 1.2

Author Biography

William McCorkle, Masaryk University

William (Lee) W. McCorkle Jr., is Senior Research Fellow at Laboratory for the Experimental Research of Religion and Ritual, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic, and Managing Editor, Journal of Cognitive Historiography.

References

Barkow, Jerome H., Leda Cosmides and John Tooby. 1992. The Adapted Mind: Evolutionary Psychology and the Generation of Culture. New York: Oxford University Press.

Boyer, Pascal. 1994. The Naturalness of Religious Ideas: A Cognitive Theory of Religion. Oakland, CA: University of California Press.

Diamond, Jared. 1999. Guns, Germs and Steel: The Fate of Human Societies. New York: W. W. Norton.

Guthrie, Stewart. 1993. Faces in the Clouds: A New Theory of Religion. New York: Oxford University Press.

Jaspers, Karl. 1953. The Origin and Goal of History. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Lawson, E. Thomas, and Robert N. McCauley. 1993. Rethinking Religion: Connecting Cognition and Culture. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

McCutheon, Russell. 2003. Manufacturing Religion: The Discourse on Sui Generis Religion and The Politics of Nostalgia. New York: Oxford University Press.

Smith, Jonathan Z. 2004. Relating Religion: Essays in the Study of Religion. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Tooby, John, and Leda Cosmides. 1992. “The Psychological Foundations of Culture”. In: The Adapted Mind: Evolutionary Psychology and the Generation of Culture, ed. Jerome H. Barkow, Leda Cosmides and John Tooby. New York: Oxford University Press, 19–136.

Whitehouse, Harvey. 1995. Inside the Cult: Religious Innovation and Transmission in Papua New Guinea. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Published

2015-04-29

How to Cite

McCorkle, W. (2015). Cognitive Historiography: Religion as an Artifact of Culture and Cognition. Journal of Cognitive Historiography, 1(2), 140–145. https://doi.org/10.1558/jch.v1i2.25883

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