A Reply to Nichols’ “The Unfulfilled Promise of Cross-Cultural, Interdisciplinary Ancient History”

Authors

  • G. E. R. Lloyd Needham Research Institute

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/jch.19549

Keywords:

Ancient China, Ancient Greece, History, Interdisciplinary Research, Psychology

Abstract

A critical reply to Ryan Nichols’ commentary on my book The Ambivalences of Rationality: Ancient and Modern Cross-Cultural Explorations (2018) published in this issue of the Journal of Cognitive Historiography.

Author Biography

G. E. R. Lloyd, Needham Research Institute

Sir Geoffrey Lloyd is a historian of Ancient Philosophy and Science at the University of Cambridge. He is currently Senior Scholar in Residence at the Needham Research Institute in Cambridge, UK.

References

Bloom, A. 1981. The Linguistic Shaping of Thought. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

Henrich, J., S. J. Heine and A. Norenzayan. 2010. “The Weirdest People in the World?” Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33(2–3): 61–83. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0140525X0999152X DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0140525X0999152X

Leese, M. 2018. Review of Lloyd, G. E. R., The Ambivalences of Rationality: Ancient and Modern Cross-Cultural Explorations. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018. Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2018.09.41. Available at: https://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2018/2018.09.41

Lloyd, G. E. R. 1966. Polarity and Analogy: Two Types of Argumentation in Early Greek Thought. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lloyd, G. E. R. 2007. Cognitive Variations: Reflections on the Unity and Diversity of the Human Mind. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Lloyd, G. E. R. 2018. The Ambivalences of Rationality: Ancient and Modern Cross-cultural Explorations. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108328951 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108328951

Nisbett, R. E. 2003. The Geography of Thought. How Asians and Westerners Think Differently … and Why. New York: Free Press.

Published

2022-01-06

How to Cite

Lloyd, G. E. R. . (2022). A Reply to Nichols’ “The Unfulfilled Promise of Cross-Cultural, Interdisciplinary Ancient History”. Journal of Cognitive Historiography, 6(1-2), 191–193. https://doi.org/10.1558/jch.19549

Issue

Section

Discussion / 3