THE CHARLES STRONG LECTURE 2015 Two Disconnected Discourses of Disconnection: Anti-West and Anti-Islamic Discourses

Authors

  • Gary Bouma Monash University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/jasr.v29i1.30375

Keywords:

Religious Conflict, Islamophobia, Anti-west, narratives, ‘othering’, cui bono

Abstract

Narratives like paradigms offer explanations of some aspect of life which are largely self-contained, self-sustaining, self-validating and impervious to disconfirming evidence. Anti-Islam discourses in the West and Anti-Western discourses among Muslims are two such discourses. That such discourses can legitimate violence is clearly evident in the rhetoric, actions and rationales given for violence among such groups as the Islamic State, Boko Haram, The Lord’s Liberation Army, The Spanish Inquisition, and Anti-Islamic movements in Europe and other parts of the West. Narratives of difference, of negative disconnection from some ‘other’ exist for centuries with minor variation as there is no real contact between those maintaining them. Real encounters would lead to disconfirmation while violent acts by some members of the ‘other’ group are taken as proof that the stereotypes held about them are true. In each age it must be asked, ‘Who Benefits?’

Author Biography

Gary Bouma, Monash University

Gary D Bouma is the UNESCO Chair in Intercultural and Interreligious Relations – Asia Pacific, Emeritus Professor of Sociology at Monash University, and the Australian Node of the Religion and Diversity Project, University of Ottawa, an Associate Priest in the Anglican Parish of St John’s East Malvern and Chair of the Academic Board, Harvest Bible College

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Published

2016-08-30

How to Cite

Bouma, G. (2016). THE CHARLES STRONG LECTURE 2015 Two Disconnected Discourses of Disconnection: Anti-West and Anti-Islamic Discourses. Journal for the Academic Study of Religion, 29(1), 3–12. https://doi.org/10.1558/jasr.v29i1.30375

Issue

Section

Conference Report