ASSESSMENT AND DOCUMENTATION OF RELIGION AND SPIRITUALITY IN THE LIVERPOOL CARE PATHWAY FOR THE DYING PATIENT

HOW WELL IS IT DONE?

Authors

  • Claire Tuck Strathcarron Hospice, Stirlingshire

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/hscc.v12i2.52

Keywords:

religion, spirituality, Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying, LCP, Bereavement, Dying

Abstract

Introduction: The Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying (LCP) provides a standardised evidence-based approach to caring for patients and their relatives in the final days of life (MCPIL, 2009). Goal 6, Section 1 of the LCP assesses religion and spirituality. Methods: A retrospective audit of assessment and documentation of Goal 6, Section 1 of the LCP was carried out between 1.6.08 – 31.8.08. Following discussion with the MCPIL, a standard for 80% compliance was set. Results: Compliance with the 80% standard was not met. 50% of patients and 74% of relatives had their religious/spiritual needs assessed with them. 42% of patients had a religious tradi-tion/spiritual need identified and 42% of patients were offered internal chaplaincy support. Internal discussion suggested Hospice staff were not always comfortable discussing religion/spirituality with patients and their families and that religion was easier to document than spirituality. Conclusions: Ways in which provision of religious/spiritual care to dying patients and their families might be facilitated were discussed internally and recommendations for providing this care were made.

Author Biography

Claire Tuck, Strathcarron Hospice, Stirlingshire

Claire Tuck is a Clinical Assistant in Palliative Medicine at Strathcarron Hospice, Stirlingshire.

References

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Published

2013-04-06

How to Cite

Tuck, C. (2013). ASSESSMENT AND DOCUMENTATION OF RELIGION AND SPIRITUALITY IN THE LIVERPOOL CARE PATHWAY FOR THE DYING PATIENT: HOW WELL IS IT DONE?. Health and Social Care Chaplaincy, 52-59. https://doi.org/10.1558/hscc.v12i2.52