https://journal.equinoxpub.com/HSCC/issue/feed Health and Social Care Chaplaincy 2020-02-07T13:01:30+00:00 Meg Burton meg.burton@gmail.com Open Journal Systems <p><em>Health and Social Care Chaplaincy</em>&nbsp;is a multidisciplinary forum for the discussion of a range of issues related to the delivery of spiritual care across various settings: acute, paediatric, mental health, palliative care and community.</p> https://journal.equinoxpub.com/HSCC/article/view/16784 Challenges, Lessons and the Future 2020-02-07T13:01:18+00:00 Meg Burton meg.burton@gmail.com 2020-02-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/HSCC/article/view/16792 Richard Behers, <i>Spiritual Care for People Living with Dementia Using Multisensory Interventions – A Practical Guide for Chaplains</i> 2020-02-07T13:01:26+00:00 Kate Le Sueur kate.lesueur@mha.org.uk <p>Richard Behers, <em>Spiritual Care for People Living with Dementia Using Multisensory Interventions – A Practical Guide for Chaplains</em>. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2018, 128 pp. (Pbk). ISBN: 978-1-78592-811- 6, £14.99.</p> 2020-02-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/HSCC/article/view/16793 Mark Graves, <i>Insight to Heal Co-creating Beauty amidst Human Suffering</i> 2020-02-07T13:01:27+00:00 Helen Garrard mark.newitt@sth.nhs.uk <p>Mark Graves,<em> Insight to Heal Co-creating Beauty amidst Human Suffering</em>. Cambridge: ress, 2017, 305 pp (Pbk) ISBN: 978-0-7188-9508-2.</p> 2020-02-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/HSCC/article/view/16794 Monika Renz (trans. Mark Kyburn with John Peck), <i>Dying a Transition</i> 2020-02-07T13:01:27+00:00 David Buck david.bcuk@suerydercare.org <p>Monika Renz (trans. Mark Kyburn with John Peck),<em> Dying a Transition</em>. New York: Columbia University Press, 2015, 164 pp. (Pbk). ISBN 978-0-231-17088-8, £30.</p> 2020-02-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/HSCC/article/view/16795 Harriet Mowatt and Donald Mowatt, <i>The Freedom of Years: Aging in Perspective</i> 2020-02-07T13:01:28+00:00 Andrew Heslop chaplaincy@srft.nhs.uk <p>Harriet Mowatt and Donald Mowatt, <em>The Freedom of Years: Aging in Perspective</em>. Abingdon: BRF, 2018. 187 pp. (Pbk). ISBN: 978 0 85746 506 1. £8.99.</p> 2020-02-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/HSCC/article/view/16796 Andrew Goodhead and Nigel Hartley (eds), <i>Spirituality in Hospice Care: How Staff and Volunteers can Support the Dying and their Families</i> 2020-02-07T13:01:28+00:00 Steve Nolan stevenolan@pah.org.uk <p>Andrew Goodhead and Nigel Hartley (eds), <em>Spirituality in Hospice Care: How Staff and Volunteers can Support the Dying and their Families</em>. London: Jessica Kingsley, 2018. 240 pp. (Pbk). ISBN: 978-1-78592-102-5, eISBN 978-1-78450-368-0, £19.99.</p> 2020-02-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/HSCC/article/view/16797 Ray Samuriwo, Ben Hannigan, Stephen Pattison, Andrew Todd, <i>Values in Health and Social Care An Introductory Workbook</i> 2020-02-07T13:01:29+00:00 Allison Cline-Dean allison.cline-dean@esneft.nhs.uk <p>Ray Samuriwo, Ben Hannigan, Stephen Pattison, Andrew Todd, <em>Values in Health and Social Care An Introductory Workbook</em>. London: Jessica Kingsley, 2017, 152 pp. (Pbk). ISBN: 978-1-78592 0639, £19.99.</p> 2020-02-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/HSCC/article/view/16798 Andreas M. Krafft, Pasqualina Perrig-Chiello, Andreas M. Walker, <i>Hope for a Good Life: Results of the Hope-Barometer International Research Programme</i> 2020-02-07T13:01:29+00:00 Fran Kissack fran.kissack@sth.nhs.uk <p>Andreas M. Krafft, Pasqualina Perrig-Chiello, Andreas M. Walker, <em>Hope for a Good Life: Results of the Hope-Barometer International Research Programme.</em> Switzerland: Springer, 2018, 215 pp. (Hbk). ISBN 978-3-319-78469-4, £79.</p> 2020-02-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/HSCC/article/view/16799 Dr Michael Paterson, <i>Childhood Sexual Abuse: Caring for Yourself and Others</i> 2020-02-07T13:01:30+00:00 Graham Peacock grahampeacock@nhs.org <p>Dr Michael Paterson, <em>Childhood Sexual Abuse: Caring for Yourself and Others</em>. Chawton: Redemptorist, 2018, 54 pp. (Pbk) ISBN 0780852315408 £4.95.</p> 2020-02-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/HSCC/article/view/16800 Jorge Stolz, Judith Könemann, Mallory Schneuwly Purdie, Thomas Englberger and Michael Krüggeler, <i>(Un)Believing in Modern Society: Religion, Spirituality, and Religious-Secular Competition</i> 2020-02-07T13:01:30+00:00 Chris Swift chris.swift@mha.org.uk <p>Jorge Stolz, Judith Könemann, Mallory Schneuwly Purdie, Thomas Englberger and Michael Krüggeler, <em>(Un)Believing in Modern Society: Religion, Spirituality, and Religious-Secular Competition</em>. London: Routledge, 2016. 296 pp. ISBN 9781472461285 (Hbk) £115.</p> 2020-02-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/HSCC/article/view/16787 Hospital-based Spiritual Care for Mothers of Neonates at RMBH in Eldoret, Kenya 2020-02-07T13:01:20+00:00 Eunice Karanja Kamaara ekamaara@gmail.com Paul Nyongesa drpaulnyongesa@gmail.com Hazel O. Ayanga hayangaus@yahoo.com Emily J. Choge-Kerama baraka_@yahoo.com Dinah Chelagat dinachela@yahoo.com Joseph K. Koech jkoechkip@yahoo.com Mohamed Mraja mraja2001@yahoo.com Edith K. Chemorion ekchemorion@gmail.com Joseph Mothaly jkmothaly@gmail.com Lucy Kiyiapi lucycelima64@gmail.com Joseph Katwa kigen_katwa@yahoo.com Jack Odunga jackodunga@gmail.com James Lemons jlemons@iu.edu <p>Although the World Health Organization defines health holistically (WHO 2016), and although a positive relationship exists between spirituality and health, maternity care globally focuses on physical and psychological care while excluding spiritual care. In Kenya, spiritual care in hospital settings has received little attention. Yet, cross-culturally, childbearing and motherhood are perceived to be highly spiritual events, but which may be traumatic especially if obstetric complications, postpartum depression, and death occur. Spiritual care is positively associated with patients’ ability to cope with negative experiences but also with a healthy birth process with optimal outcomes. Towards improving obstetric care by integrating professional clinical pastoral care in hospital settings in Kenya, we carried out a baseline study to explore the birthing physical, psychological and spiritual experiences of mothers of neonates admitted at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of the Riley Mother and Baby Hospital (RMBH) in Eldoret, Kenya. This article presents the results of the study.</p> 2020-02-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/HSCC/article/view/16788 Integrating Spiritual Care into Maternity Care at a University Teaching and Referral Hospital in Eldoret, Kenya 2020-02-07T13:01:22+00:00 Paul Nyongesa drpaulnyongesa@yahoo.com Eunice Kamaara eunkamaara@yahoo.com Hazel O. Ayanga hayangaus@yahoo.com Joseph Mothaly jkmothaly@yahoo.ca Simon Peter Akim simonpeterakim@gmail.com Steven Ivy sivy@iupui.edu James Lemons jlemons@iu.edu <p>Spiritual needs of care seekers, families and caregivers are ignored in maternity care in health facilities in Kenya. The quality of care remains poor with unacceptable maternal and neonatal mortalities. The Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) Project at the College of Health Sciences of Moi University Eldoret, Kenya, aimed to integrate spiritual care into maternity care at The Riley Mother and Baby Hospital of The Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital (MTRH), Eldoret, Kenya, in order to provide holistic healthcare. In phase I, spiritual needs of mothers of neonates admitted to the Newborn Unit at the MTRH in Eldoret, Kenya, were assessed using a research protocol with modified North America validated tools (see Appendix) and unstructured interview guides. For phase II, hospital chaplains, trained using a Moi University post-graduate diploma curriculum for clinical pastoral education and care, were engaged as spiritual caregivers at the Hospital. In phase III, the same tools were used to re-assess spiritual needs after introducing spiritual care. This article presents challenges and progress made, lessons learnt from the CPE Project and knowledge gaps identified from the study. Baseline data showed lack of trained hospital chaplains and inadequate spiritual care at the Teaching and Referral hospital despite great need by patients, caregivers and families. Lack of precise definitions, theoretical and conceptual frameworks for spirituality in literature emerged as a challenge. The Kenya Chaplaincy Training Centre was initiated at the hospital to train hospital chaplains and healthcare providers who could provide spiritual care. A psychobiosocial conceptual framework, utility tools and a new theory for self-empowerment were proposed to address knowledge gaps in current literature.</p> 2020-02-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/HSCC/article/view/16790 WELLHEAD 2020-02-07T13:01:24+00:00 Katharyn Joanna Mumby kath@new-pathways.co.uk David Grace revdgrace@yahoo.co.uk <p>Spirituality is a neglected aspect of healthcare and rehabilitation for those with acquired communication difficulties such as aphasia (language impairment) as a consequence of stroke, neurological disease and dementia. Collaborative working between health professionals and chaplaincy services in promoting spiritual health is desirable and necessary in the context of barriers to the delivery of spiritual care, which are explored from a hospital speech and language therapy perspective. Terminological and institutional barriers, restricted care provision, lack of knowledge and awareness, and lack of resources appropriate in communication impairment, gave rise to “WELLHEAD”, a novel approach to spiritual health assessment, intervention and outcomes measurement originated by Dr Katharyn Mumby. The article describes the theoretical framework and content of WELLHEAD. Reflections are outlined about the positive collaboration between speech and language therapy, chaplaincy services and people with aphasia in feasibility work with WELLHEAD, an approach offering tools for further application and development.</p> 2020-02-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/HSCC/article/view/16791 Are the Providers of Spiritual Care in your Hospital Capable? Narrative Review of Professional Accountability in Australia 2020-02-07T13:01:25+00:00 Kate Eve Kathryn.Eve@anu.edu.au Christine Phillips christine.phillips@anu.edu.au <p>Although spiritual care practitioners, also variously known as pastoral care workers or chaplains, have had a foundational presence in most Australian hospitals, the discipline has been poorly regulated and does not have national standards of care. This leads to inconsistencies in the way hospital administrators are able to scrutinize the credentials, supervision processes and capability of the Spiritual Care workforce. This paper is a narrative review of the systems ensuring safe practice for the Spiritual Care workforce, focusing on the relationships between professional associations, clinical workforce capability and education in this field of practice in Australia. Substantial gaps and inconsistencies are revealed in the education and training of clinical practitioners, findings which align with variability of practitioner capability and which provide no assurance of quality or accountability. On the basis of these findings, recommendations are provided for relevant stakeholders with a view to improving safety and quality of care consistent with other health care professions and to assure the Australian public that accountability is core to the services provided in their name and under their jurisdiction.</p> 2020-02-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/HSCC/article/view/16785 Spirituality and Childbirth 2020-02-07T13:01:18+00:00 Susan Crowther s.a.crowther@rgu.ac.uk <p>Spirituality at the end of life is often explored in the literature and in research yet despite the shared experience of childbirth within society there has been little spirituality focus on the start of life. However, interest in this area is slowly gathering momentum. This article shows how childbirth is overflowing with spiritual and existential meaningfulness for all. The impact of this major event in human life and our shared natality warrants closer examination. Using the framework “ecology of birth” the significance of “how” we do things is shown to matter as much as what we do, or not do, in and round childbirth. Drawing on research and practice this article asks us to collectively think about childbirth in ways that honour childbirth’s spiritual and existential meaningfulness and significance. Further multidisciplinary research to inform an art of practice in and around childbirth is suggested. By moving from the prevalent calculative mode of thinking in contemporary maternity care systems to a more contemplative mode of thinking we can be enabled to think afresh about the ways we “do things” and how we “are there” around childbirth without adopting polemic positions.</p> 2020-02-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/HSCC/article/view/16786 Spiritual and Religious Aspects of Pregnancy and Birth in Nigeria 2020-02-07T13:01:19+00:00 Magdalena Ohaja magdalena.ohaja@nuigalway.ie Jo Murphy-Lawless jo@murphylawless.ie Margaret Dunlea dunleama@tcd.ie <p>Nigeria is both a multi-ethnic and multi-religious society, with plural health systems – unorthodox (traditional and faith-based) and orthodox (formal or modern) healthcare. Religious, spiritual and cultural/traditional beliefs about health and wellbeing remain central in everyday pregnancy and childbirth discourses in many lessincome countries including Nigeria. This qualitative hermeneutic study explored the spiritual and religious aspects of pregnancy and birth from the perspective of Igbo-Nigerian women. A purposive sample of 25 women took part in an individual faceto- face audio-recorded interview. Data were analysed using Gadamerian hermeneutic principles to unpack the meaning of religious and spiritual practices of pregnancy and birthing as articulated by women. The three themes that emerged are: “reliance on the supremacy of God”, “belief in supernatural forces”, and “keeping it secret” with most emphasis on the first theme. Pregnancy and birth are physiological and psychosocial events which have deep-seated spiritual connections. An understanding of the spiritual and religious aspects of women’s need during pregnancy and birthing becomes crucial.</p> 2020-02-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd.