Is There Evidence-based Confirmation of the Value of Pastoral and Spiritual Care?

An Invitation To a Conversation

Authors

  • John Foskett Somerset Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/hscc.v1i1.83

Keywords:

Chaplaincy, compassion, experience, institutions, mental health professions, service user/patient, spiritual assessment, user-led research

Abstract

This article begins as a response to Julian Raffay’s exploration of spiritual assessment and care based upon the assessment tool HOPE (JHCC 12.2). It draws upon experience and research in spirituality and religion in the South West of the UK, comparing it with other research and publications. It recounts how research by and amongst mental health service users, professionals and religious leaders reveals important aspects of spiritual and religious care for people with mental health problems. Recent publications confirm the importance of user-led research and practice for their spiritual care and wellbeing. It is an invitation to join this conversation.

Author Biography

John Foskett, Somerset Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

John Foskett is a Retired Anglican priest and an Adviser in religion and spirituality to the Somerset Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Bridgwater, UK.

References

Ballatt, John, and Penelope Campling (2011). Intelligent Kindness: Reforming the Culture of Health Care. London: RCPsych Publications.

Fitchett, George (1993). Assessing Spiritual Needs: A Guide for Caregivers. Minneapolis, MN: Augsburg Fortress.

Foskett, John, and Vicky Nicholls (2004a). “From Research to Practice”. Mental Health, Religion & Culture 7, no. 1: 41–58. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13674670310001602481

Foskett, John, and Fay Wilson Rudd (2004b). “Mental Health, Religion and Spirituality: Attitudes, Experience and Expertise Among Mental Health Professionals and Religious Leaders in Somerset”. Mental Health, Religion & Culture 7, no. 1 (2004b): 5–22. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13674670310001602490

Goldacre, Ben (2012). Bad Pharma. London: Fourth Estate.

Hay, David, and Rebecca Nye (2006). The Spirit of the Child. London: Jessica Kingsley.

Laurance, Jeremy (2002). Pure Madness: How Fear Drives the Mental Health System. London: Routledge.

MacMin, Liz, and John Foskett (2004). “‘Don’t Be Afraid to Tell’: The Spiritual and Religious Experience of Mental Health Service Users in Somerset”. Mental Health, Religion & Culture 7, no. 1: 23–40. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13674670310001602508

Mental Health Foundation. Knowing Our Own Minds. London: MHF, 1979.

Nicholls, Vicky, ed. (2002). Taken Seriously: the Somerset Spirituality Project. London: MHF.

Raffay, Julian (2012). “Are Our Mental Health Practices Beyond HOPE?” Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy 12, no. 2 (2012): 68–80.

Speck, Peter (1994). “Working with Dying People”. In The Unconscious at Work, eds. Anton Obholzer and Vega Zagier Roberts, 94–100. London: Routledge.

Survivors (1992). Poetry. London: Survivors Press.

Swinton, John (2012). “Reflections on Autistic Love: What Does Love Look Like?” Practical Theology 5, no. 3 (2012): 259–78. http://dx.doi.org/10.1558/prth.v5i3.259

Walsh, J. (2012). “Assessing the Frequency of Care Plan Attention to the Expressed Spiritual and Religious Needs of Service Users in a Health and Social Care Trust”. Unpublished MA dissertation, University of Staffordshire. In Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy 12, no. 2: 68–80.

Published

2013-09-25

How to Cite

Foskett, J. (2013). Is There Evidence-based Confirmation of the Value of Pastoral and Spiritual Care? An Invitation To a Conversation. Health and Social Care Chaplaincy, 1(1), 83-90. https://doi.org/10.1558/hscc.v1i1.83

Issue

Section

Articles