The Birth of a European Research Institute for Chaplains in Healthcare (ERICH)

Initiated by Chaplains for the Promotion of Research by Chaplains

Authors

  • Ewan Kelly Academic Centre for Practical Theology, KU Leuven
  • Anne Vandenhoeck Academic Centre for Practical Theology, KU Leuven

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/hscc.34304

Keywords:

Chaplains in Healthcare, ERICH

Abstract

On the 6 June the European Research Institute for Chaplains in Healthcare (ERICH) celebrated its launch at the University of Leuven, Belgium, in the company of over 180 chaplains, chaplaincy researchers and academics from 15 European countries. It was an energizing day of plenary presentations, discussion and networking. World leaders in the areas of integrating spirituality into healthcare and chaplaincy research education, Professor Christina Puchalski (George Washington Institute of Spirituality) and Prof George Fitchett (Rush University, Chicago), were the keynote speakers. Chaplaincy researchers from all over Europe shared their research practice, ideas and findings in a variety of formats. This article seeks to share some of the reasons to celebrate ERICH’s formation by describing its background, vision, makeup and planned activities.

Author Biographies

Ewan Kelly, Academic Centre for Practical Theology, KU Leuven

Ewan Kelly is Research Co-ordinator at the European Institute for Chaplains in Healthcare and Visiting Professor in the Academic Centre for Practical Theology, KU Leuven, Belgium.

Anne Vandenhoeck, Academic Centre for Practical Theology, KU Leuven

Anne Vandenhoeck is Director of the European Institute for Chaplains in Healthcare and Professor and Chair of the Academic Centre for Practical Theology, KU Leuven, Belgium.

References

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Snowden, A., I. Telfer, E. Kelly, H. Mowat, S. Bunniss and N. Howard (2012) Healthcare Chaplaincy: The Lothian Chaplaincy Patient Reported Outcome Measure (PROM). Gourock: Snowden and Snowden Ltd. Available online at www.snowdenresearch.co.uk (accessed 14 July 2017).

Snowden, A., I. Telfer, E. Kelly, S. Bunnis and H. Mowat (2013a) “The Construction of the Lothian PROM”. Scottish Journal of Healthcare Chaplaincy 16: 3–13.

—(2013b) “The Operationalization of Person-Centred Care: ‘I Was Able to Talk About What Was On My Mind’”. Scottish Journal of Healthcare Chaplaincy 16: 14–22.

—(2013c) “Spiritual Care as Person-Centred Care: A Thematic Analysis of Interventions”. Scottish Journal of Healthcare Chaplaincy 16: 23–32.

Snowden, A., and I. J. M. Telfer (2017) “A Patient Reported Outcome Measure of Spiritual Care as Delivered by Chaplains”. Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy 23(4): 131–55. http://doi.org/10.1080/08854726.2017.1279935

VandeCreek, L., and M. Lyon (2014) “The General Hospital Chaplain’s Ministry: Analysis of Productivity, Quality and Cost”. The Caregiver’s Journal 11(2): 3–10. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1077842X.1995.10781714

Published

2018-04-12

How to Cite

Kelly, E., & Vandenhoeck, A. (2018). The Birth of a European Research Institute for Chaplains in Healthcare (ERICH): Initiated by Chaplains for the Promotion of Research by Chaplains. Health and Social Care Chaplaincy, 5(2), 297-305. https://doi.org/10.1558/hscc.34304