Evaluating Digital Projects

Authors

  • Jeri Wieringa University of Alabama

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/bsor.20089

Keywords:

Data, Crowdsourcing, Transcription, Database, Digital Projects

Abstract

Digital humanities takes public scholarship to the next level. Whether looking for the best tools or learning about new developments within the field, “The Download” can help you refine your work in digital religious studies. Professor Jeri Wieringa (University of Alabama) provides insight into this new mode of scholarship by highlighting the challenges and nuances of online platforms.

References

Faull, Katherine et al. n.d. “Moravian Lives: Tracing the Movements and History of Members of the Moravian Church (1750-2012).” Available at: https://moravian.bucknell.edu (accessed May 2021).

Heppler, Jason A. and Gabriel K. Wolfenstein. n.d. “Crowdsourcing Digital Public History.” The American Historian. Available at: https://tah.oah.org/content/crowdsourcing-digital-public-history (accessed May 2021).

Posner, Miriam. 2016. “What is the Humanities? What is Digital Humanities? Why Are We Here?” Class lecture at the University of California, Los Angeles. Available at: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/5x5tg8h5l0yndte/AAA5unyKujzdXEC1D_e_GzHza?dl=0&preview=1B+DH101.pdf.

Published

2021-08-12

How to Cite

Wieringa, J. . (2021). Evaluating Digital Projects. Bulletin for the Study of Religion, 50(1), 33–37. https://doi.org/10.1558/bsor.20089

Issue

Section

The Download

Categories