Evidentiary Boundaries and Improper Interventions

Evidence, Implications, and Illegitimacy in American Religious Studies

Authors

  • Kelly J. Baker University of Tennessee

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/bsor.v41i4.2

Keywords:

zombies, Ku Klux Klan, evidence, American religions

Abstract

What is the evidence of American religions? This article documents how some evidence becomes suspect and illegitimate while other evidence is assumed to be worthy of scholarly trust. The assumed speciousness of popular culture, in this case zombies, as a source and the danger of sources from so-called fringe movements become important venues to problematize preferenced evidence. How is that some religious movements, labeled dangerous, produce evidence that cannot be trusted at face value? Why is there deep concern over the legitimacy of pop culture as a method to study religion? Relying upon Klan print and zombie culture, this article forces the issue of legitimacy and illegitimacy of evidence.

Author Biography

Kelly J. Baker, University of Tennessee

Kelly J. Baker is Lecturer in Religious Studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and Associate Editor of Bulletin for the Study of Religion.

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Published

2012-12-03

How to Cite

Baker, K. (2012). Evidentiary Boundaries and Improper Interventions: Evidence, Implications, and Illegitimacy in American Religious Studies. Bulletin for the Study of Religion, 41(4), 2–11. https://doi.org/10.1558/bsor.v41i4.2

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