Political Bodies and a Touch of Pain

An Interview with Darlene Juschka

Authors

  • Matt Sheedy University of Manitoba

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/bsor.v42i1.37

Keywords:

gender, women, religion, theory, pain, body, postmodernism, postcolonialism, critical theory

Abstract

An interview with Darlene Juschka (cross-appointed Professor of Women's and Gender Studies and Religious Studies at the University of Regina), focusing on her 2009 book Political Bodies/Body Politics: The Semiotics of Gender (Equinox Publishing). The conversation ranged from a look at some of the key influences upon her theoretical development to her work on the construction of gender/sex in the Eurowest and its deployment through myth, ritual and sign-symbol, along with applications of this theory to religious studies and her more recent work on the concept of pain.

Author Biography

Matt Sheedy, University of Manitoba

Matt Sheedy is a PhD. candidate at the University of Manitoba, in Winnipeg, and an Associate Editor at the Bulletin for the Study of Religion. His research interests include critical social theory (from the Frankfurt School to poststructuralism), method and theory, secularization and ritual theory, fundamentalism, ethics and social movements. Religion and culture, including issues of gender, race, and class, is also of great interest, especially representations via news media, film, TV, etc. His dissertation offers a critique of Juergen Habermas's theory of religion in the public sphere and he is also conducting research on myths, rituals and symbols in the Occupy Movement, which includes fieldwork at Occupy Winnipeg.

References

Juschka, Darlene. Political Bodies/Body Politics: The Semiotics of Gender. Equinox Publishing, 2009.

Juschka, Darlene. “Pain, Gender, and Systems of Belief and Practices.” Social Compass 5.11 (2011): 708-719.

Published

2013-03-08

How to Cite

Sheedy, M. (2013). Political Bodies and a Touch of Pain: An Interview with Darlene Juschka. Bulletin for the Study of Religion, 42(1), 37–40. https://doi.org/10.1558/bsor.v42i1.37

Issue

Section

The Interview