Windows and Mirrors

Texts, Religions, and Stories of Origins

Authors

  • Philip L. Tite University of Washington

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/bsor.v45i2.30964

Keywords:

Ancient manuscript finds, Nag Hammadi, affect theory, pedagogy, Bulletin for the Study of Religion

Abstract

Editor's introduction to the June 2016 issue of the Bulletin for the Study of Religion, specifically discussing how we treat our data sets as windows ("windows into the past") when they serve as mirrors (reflecting modern, scholarly presuppositions).

Author Biography

Philip L. Tite, University of Washington

Philip L. Tite is an Affiliate Lecturer at the University of Washington and an adjunct instructor at Seattle University in Seattle WA USA. He holds a PhD degree from McGill University (2005) and has authored several books and articles. His most recent books include The Apocryphal Epistle to the Laodiceans: An Epistolary and Rhetorical Analysis (TENT, 7; Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2012) and Valentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity (NHMS, 67; Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2009). As a specialist in the study of early Christianity, in particular Valentinian Gnosticism, Tite has strong interests in elucidating social processes at work in the study of religious phenomena. He also has strong interests in method and theory, religion and violence, and pedagogical issues in the academic study of religion.

References

Burke, Tony, ed. 2013. Ancient Gospel or Modern Forgery: The Secret Gospel of Mark in Debate. Proceedings of the 2011 York University Christian Apocrypha Symposium. Eugene, OR: Cascade Books.

Chidester, David. 2000. “Colonialism.” In Guide to the Study of Religion, edited by Willi Braun and Russell T. McCutcheon, 432–37. London: Cassell.

Denzey Lewis, Nicola, and Justine Ariel Blount. 2014. “Rethinking the Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices.” Journal of Biblical Literature 133: 399–419. http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/jbl.2014.0017.

Goodacre, Mark. 2013. “How Reliable is the Story of the Nag Hammadi Discovery?” Journal for the Study of the New Testament 35: 303–22. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0142064X13482243

Robinson, James M. 2014a. The Nag Hammadi Story, Volume 1: From the Discovery to the Publication. Nag Hammadi and Manichaean Studies 86. Leiden: Brill .

Robinson, James M. 2014b. The Nag Hammadi Story, Volume 2: The Publication. Nag Hammadi and Manichaean Studies 86. Leiden: Brill

Schaefer, Donovan O. 2015. Religious Affects: Animality, Evolution, and Power. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. http://dx.doi.org/10.1215/9780822374909.

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Published

2016-07-06

How to Cite

Tite, P. (2016). Windows and Mirrors: Texts, Religions, and Stories of Origins. Bulletin for the Study of Religion, 45(2), 2-3. https://doi.org/10.1558/bsor.v45i2.30964

Issue

Section

The Editorial