Who Says a Headscarf Emoji is Religious?

(And Why?)

Authors

  • Joseph P. Laycock Texas State University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/bsor.34098

Keywords:

emoji, definition of religion, secularism

Abstract

Who Says a Headscarf Emoji is Religious? (And Why?)

Author Biography

Joseph P. Laycock, Texas State University

Joseph Laycock is an assistant professor of religious studies at Texas State University.

References

Alhumedhi, Rayouf. 2016. “UTC Document Submission: HEADSCARF EMOJI.” September 13. https://www.scribd.com/document/323429115/Draft-Headscarf-Emoji-Propsal.

Don. 2016. “Kek.” Knowyourmeme.com, September 16. http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/kek.

Eliade, Mircea. 1958. Patterns in Comparative Religion. Translated by Rosemary Sheed. New York: Sheed and Ward.

McCutcheon, Russell. 2007. “‘They Licked the Platter Clean’: On the Co-Dependency of the Religious and the Secular.” Method and Theory in the Study of Religion 19: 173–99.

Smith, Jonathan Z. 1998. “Religion, Religions, Religious.” In Critical Terms for Religious Studies, edited by Mark C. Taylor, 269–84. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Spencer, Paul. 2016. “Trump’s Occult Online Supporters Believe ‘Meme Magic’ Got Him Elected.” Motherboard, November 18. https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/pgkx7g/trumps-occult-online-supporters-believe-pepe-meme-magic-got-him-elected.

Published

2017-12-21

How to Cite

Laycock, J. (2017). Who Says a Headscarf Emoji is Religious? (And Why?). Bulletin for the Study of Religion, 46(3-4), 61–63. https://doi.org/10.1558/bsor.34098

Issue

Section

Articles