Student and Teacher Perceptions of Plagiarism in Academic Writing

Authors

  • Nahla Nola Bacha Lebanese American University
  • Rima Bahous Lebanese American University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/wap.v2i2.251

Keywords:

EFL/ESL Writing, Plagiarism, university disciplines, academic writing, Lebanon

Abstract

Writing is no easy task in any discipline and at any stage in a student’s course of university study. In addition, it brings with it the important concern of plagiarism. Obtaining student and teacher perceptions of the strategies students use to produce their assignments has been valuable in identifying and dealing with plagiarism. This article reports on a survey carried out at one English-medium university in Lebanon of 358 Arabic student views by discipline and year and 31 teacher views on the strategies students use to “improve” their written assignments. Results show that although students are aware of the prevalence of plagiarism in all disciplines and in all years of study, they perceive more incidences in the professional disciplines, at advanced levels, and in student use of strategies that give help to and gain help from their peers. Teachers indicated higher student use of all strategies and a greater extent of plagiarism than did the students. Recommendations in line with recent research emphasizing more positive methods are made for raising student awareness of ethical writing strategies, establishing common ground on what constitutes plagiarism, and implementing pedagogical practices and institutional policies that educate rather than penalize.

Author Biographies

Nahla Nola Bacha, Lebanese American University

Nahla Nola Bacha holds a PhD in Applied Linguistics and TESOL from the University of Leicester and is an Associate Professor and Assistant Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences at the Lebanese American University, where she has been an administrator and taught academic English for over twenty years. She has published internationally in EAP/ESP, testing, discourse analysis and writing across the curriculum and is presently researching the role of EFL/ESL programs in university contexts.

Rima Bahous, Lebanese American University

Rima Bahous holds an EdD in Applied Linguistics and TESOL from the University of Leicester and is an Associate Professor and the Director of the Center for Program and Learning Assessment at the Lebanese American University, where she has taught pre-service English language teachers for over fifteen years. Her main research interests are in assessment, multicultural discourse, and English language teaching and learning.

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Published

2010-12-18

How to Cite

Bacha, N. N., & Bahous, R. (2010). Student and Teacher Perceptions of Plagiarism in Academic Writing. Writing & Pedagogy, 2(2), 251-280. https://doi.org/10.1558/wap.v2i2.251

Issue

Section

Research Matters