Sociolinguistic Studies https://journal.equinoxpub.com/SS <p>This journal takes an ecumenical approach to the different schools, methodological principles or research orientations within sociolinguistic research and also accepts contributions from related fields such as pragmatics, discourse analysis, conversational analysis, interactional linguistics, language acquisition and socialization, linguistic anthropology, ethnomethodology and the ethnography of communication. Papers may examine any issue in sociolinguistic research and occasionally papers are accepted for publication in Spanish, Galician, Portuguese or French (90% of the contents are in English). <a href="https://journal.equinoxpub.com/SS/about">Read more</a>.</p> Equinox Publishing Ltd. en-US Sociolinguistic Studies 1750-8649 <p>© Equinox Publishing Ltd.</p> <p>For information regarding our Open Access policy, <a title="Open access policy." href="Full%20details of our conditions related to copyright can be found by clicking here.">click here</a>.</p> Call center agents’ skills https://journal.equinoxpub.com/SS/article/view/19356 <p>This article follows previous research arguing that skills of call center agents, which often include emotional labor, communication, procedural and substantive knowledge, and articulation work, are mostly invisible. Moving beyond previous analyses linking call centers to low-skilled standardized work, I draw on ethnographic fieldwork and transpositional analysis in the Philippines and the UK to show which real-world processes and written practices make agents’ skills not only invisible and illegible to industry outsiders but also to their managers. I argue that textualization practices such as data entry and script work are important, and that deemphasizing quantification in favor of qualitative assessment could produce better outcomes for agents and skill appreciation by others.</p> Johanna Tovar Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2021-02-10 2021-02-10 14 4 437–458 437–458 10.1558/sols.39555 The language policy of trilingual transnational families living between Antioch, Paris and Berlin https://journal.equinoxpub.com/SS/article/view/19357 <p>In this article I analyze the family language policy of trilingual transnational families (Arabic, Turkish, French or German) through a comparative study of their intergenerational language practices in France and Germany. This study is based on a multi-sited ethnography, with recordings of individual interviews and socially situated heterogeneous language practices involving two families of three generations with similar trajectories and socioeconomic and linguistic profiles. The analyses of their language practices demonstrate that family language policy is based on individual freedom of choice; it is not explicit, fixed or rigid but unconstrained and ?uctuating. With respect to the inherited familial languages, contrary to expectations, I observe that they are maintained relatively well, especially in the case of Arabic; this is true even for the youngest participants, the third generation. I show that the factor supporting the maintenance of Arabic in the third generation is the grandparents’ alignment with the youngest participants’ language choice as well as their caring attitude, expressed mainly in Arabic, but also, though less regularly, in Turkish.</p> Suat Istanbullu Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2021-02-10 2021-02-10 14 4 459–481 459–481 10.1558/sols.39512 Trilling as a sociolinguistic variable https://journal.equinoxpub.com/SS/article/view/19358 <p>In the speech of many Hebrew speakers, the distinction between the voiceless pharyngeal fricative /?/ and its non-pharyngeal counterpart is neutralized, with the non-pharyngeal production becoming increasingly common. Although this is a well-studied phenomenon, little attention has been given so far to the possibility of meaningful variation in the non-pharyngeal forms. In this paper I demonstrate that the non-pharyngeal dorsal variant is not always a fricative, but rather, is often realized as a trill. Using data from sociolinguistic interviews conducted in two field sites in Israel, I show that the rate of trilling varies among speakers, and is sensitive to both social and linguistic factors. A key finding is that speakers who do not produce pharyngeals are more likely to produce the trill variant, but only in one of the two communities studied, in which the loss of the pharyngeals is considerably more advanced. While retention of the pharyngeals is strongly associated with Mizrahi (Middle Eastern and North African) descent, variation in trill rates interacts with ethnicity in complex ways, which shed light on the social and linguistic dynamics underlying the spread of the non-pharyngeal forms.</p> Roey J. Gafter Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2021-02-10 2021-02-10 14 4 483–503 483–503 10.1558/sols.39210 Towards the elaboration of a diastratic model in historical analyses of koineization https://journal.equinoxpub.com/SS/article/view/19359 <p>The paper argues for further development of models of koineization in a historical perspective. The four processes inherent in koineization reported in Britain (2012a) are taken as a starting point to show how the question of discerning these phenomena in the past is inherently problematic, but not impossible. After discussing some issues in identifying these processes in a medieval context, the paper moves to previous analyses of diastratic variation in studies of koineization. Using the data available for late medieval Italy, emphasis is placed on how diastratic variation is discernible in three parameters of verb morphology arising in the resultant koine, focussing on medieval Milanese. These observations, in turn, lead to further elaboration of a diastratic component in order to broaden our understanding of language change.</p> Joshua Brown Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2021-02-10 2021-02-10 14 4 505–529 505–529 10.1558/sols.39590 Editor-in-Chief’s acknowledgments https://journal.equinoxpub.com/SS/article/view/19365 Xoán Paulo Rodríguez-Yáñez Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2021-02-10 2021-02-10 14 4 557 557 10.1558/sols.27595 Offers and Offer Refusals: A Postcolonial Pragmatics Perspective on World Englishes Eric A. Anchimbe (2018) https://journal.equinoxpub.com/SS/article/view/19360 <p>Offers and Offer Refusals: A Postcolonial Pragmatics Perspective on World Englishes Eric A. Anchimbe (2018) Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins ISBN: 9789027201737 (hardback) 9789027263285 (eBook). Pp. 330&nbsp;</p> Uchenna Oyali Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2021-02-10 2021-02-10 14 4 531–535 531–535 10.1558/sols.41792 How Mediation Works: Resolving Conflict through Talk Angela Cora Garcia (2019) https://journal.equinoxpub.com/SS/article/view/19361 <p>How Mediation Works: Resolving Conflict through Talk Angela Cora Garcia (2019) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press ISBN: 978-1-107-02427-4 (hardback) 019015694 (eBook). Pp. 272&nbsp;</p> Eniola Boluwaduro Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2021-02-10 2021-02-10 14 4 537–542 537–542 10.1558/sols.42011 Investigating World Englishes: Research Methodology and Practical Applications Peter I. De Costa, Dustin Crowther and Jeffrey Maloney (eds) (2019) https://journal.equinoxpub.com/SS/article/view/19362 <p>Investigating World Englishes: Research Methodology and Practical Applications Peter I. De Costa, Dustin Crowther and Jeffrey Maloney (eds) (2019) London and New York: Routledge ISBN: 978-1-138-23743-8. Pp. 186&nbsp;</p> Kingsley Oluchi Ugwuanyi Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2021-02-10 2021-02-10 14 4 543–549 543–549 10.1558/sols.39472 African Youth Language: New Media, Performance Arts and Sociolinguistic Development Ellen Hurst-Harosh and Fridah Kanana Erastus (eds) (2019) https://journal.equinoxpub.com/SS/article/view/19363 <p>African Youth Language: New Media, Performance Arts and Sociolinguistic Development Ellen Hurst-Harosh and Fridah Kanana Erastus (eds) (2019) Cham: Palgrave Macmillan ISBN: 978-3-319-64561-2 (hbk) ISBN: 978-3-319-64562-9 (e-book). Pp. 249&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> Stephen Olabanji Boluwaduro Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2021-02-10 2021-02-10 14 4 551–555 551–555 10.1558/sols.42438