Religious Studies and Theology https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST <p>For forty years <em>Religious Studies and Theology</em> has published thoughtful, peer-reviewed original research with significance to the inter-related disciplines of Religious Studies and Theology. <a href="https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/about">Learn more.</a></p> en-US <p>© Equinox Publishing Ltd.</p> <p>For information regarding our Open Access policy, <a title="Open access policy." href="Full%20details of our conditions related to copyright can be found by clicking here.">click here</a>.</p> clcaufield@gmail.com (Catherine Caufield) aparkin@equinoxpub.com (Ailsa Parkin) Fri, 14 May 2021 22:00:44 +0000 OJS 3.3.0.7 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Ritual Gone Wrong: What We Learn from Ritual Disruption, by Kathryn T. McClymond. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/20145 <p>Ritual Gone Wrong: What We Learn from Ritual Disruption, by Kathryn T. McClymond. Oxford Ritual Studies. Oxford University Press, 2016. 242 + x pp. Pb., 35.00 USD. ISBN: 978–0–19–979092–0.</p> Richard DeMaris (Author) Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/20145 Fri, 14 May 2021 00:00:00 +0000 Understanding the Consecrated Life in Canada: Critical Essays on Contemporary Trends, edited by Jason Zuidema. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/18963 <p>Understanding the Consecrated Life in Canada: Critical Essays on Contemporary Trends, edited by Jason Zuidema. Editions SR, Volume 38 Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2015. 457 pp. + XI pp., Hb., $68. ISBN: 9781771121378.</p> Christopher Emory-Moore (Author) Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/18963 Fri, 14 May 2021 00:00:00 +0000 Understanding Affections in the Theology of Jonathan Edwards: “The High Exercises of Divine Love,” by Ryan J. Martin. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/18958 <p>Understanding Affections in the Theology of Jonathan Edwards: “The High Exercises of Divine Love,” by Ryan J. Martin. London: T &amp; T Clark, 2019. 281+ xiv pp. Cloth. $56.95. ISBN: 9780567682246</p> Don Schweitzer (Author) Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/18958 Fri, 14 May 2021 00:00:00 +0000 Making Out Jean Vanier https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/19829 <p>In early 2020, news broke of Jean Vanier’s manipulative sexual practices. Just months earlier, I had published two books about how people in Canada and around the world took up the vision of Jean Vanier, founder of L’Arche, an international network of communities of people with and without intellectual disabilities. Throughout this past year, I could not stop thinking about the whole situation, trying to make out Jean Vanier even while I want to de-center him. I find unexpected inspiration in queer theorist Kathryn Bond Stockton’s evocative book, Making Out. This reflection ends with no conclusions, only an invitation to think together about Jean Vanier and seemingly benign patriarchy.</p> Carolyn Whitney-Brown (Author) Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/19829 Fri, 14 May 2021 00:00:00 +0000 Religious Studies and Theology https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/20146 Catherine Caufield (Author) Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/20146 Fri, 14 May 2021 00:00:00 +0000 Loss of Labrets and Rise of the Gospel https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/19920 <p>Labrets, for centuries a ubiquitous feature of male Kukpugmiut facial décor, are seldom mentioned in Western Arctic contact studies. Via early lithographs and photos, this essay reviews their three-tiered typology, visualizes social strata affecting their use, and defines when they were worn. As well, it describes the surgery required for labrets’ first insertion, their role as a credibility-enhancing display (CRED), conduct related to their high cost, and the vectors, including missions, that drove their disappearance.</p> Walter Vanast (Author) Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/19920 Fri, 14 May 2021 00:00:00 +0000 Soul Retrieval Following Trauma https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/19921 <p>Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a disabling psychiatric condition involving an ongoing re-experiencing of the traumatic events. In attempting to escape the distressing emotions involved in the reliving, many PTSD patients with prolonged traumatic experiences, such as childhood abuse and war experiences, show a clinical syndrome that is characterized by dissociation (Lanius, 2010). Spiritual interventions, such as various types of soul retrieval that have been practiced by various First Peoples worldwide, can be effective in addressing the soul loss that occurs as a result of dissociation. This study applied a soul retrieval regression therapy intervention to two different research groups, university students and Indigenous adults, with statistically significant results.</p> Jane Simington, Joan I. J. Wagner (Author) Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/19921 Fri, 14 May 2021 00:00:00 +0000 The Lion is Hungry, and the Chameleon does not Eat https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/20141 <p>The Midrashic literature relates to several lacunae in the story of Noah’s ark in the biblical text and presents the reader with a wider narrative that includes educational and theological messages. The current study focuses on how the Midrashim combine various species of animals in the narrative of the flood. While the text does not note any of the animals by name, aside from the raven and the dove that have a role in the events, the Midrashic literature reports a list of animals that entered the ark. The animals are mentioned in the process of retelling the events, rather than in order to fill the zoological vacuum in the story. Aggadic homilies mention approximately fifteen animal species and they are documented in the context of each of the story’s stages: the preparations for living in the ark, the stage of entering the ark, and the life in the ark during the flood.</p> Abraham Ofir Shemesh (Author) Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/20141 Fri, 14 May 2021 00:00:00 +0000 Theology Giving Back https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/20142 <p>This essay lays foundations for a postmodern theology of donation by supplementing Jacques Derrida’s philosophy of the gift with Marcel Hénaff’s analysis of ceremonial gift exchange, John Milbank’s theology of reciprocal exchange and Hans Urs von Balthasar’s Trinitarian kenotic theology. Derrida’s philosophy of the gift provides normative criteria for the experience of transcendence within human conscious awareness. Hénaff and Milbank nuance and expand Derrida’s theory of the gift by demonstrating the asymmetrical and open-ended character of human interactions. Balthasar’s kenotic theology fleshes out Milbank’s communal understanding of donation. Jesus Christ embodies the gift, empowering human beings to bear witness before God and one another as a community able to give and receive unconditional love.</p> Jean-Pierre Fortin (Author) Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/20142 Fri, 14 May 2021 00:00:00 +0000 “Spiritual Formation for Civic Life in the Neo-Calvinist Tradition” https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/20143 <p>This paper offers an overview of how the neo-Calvinist tradition (originating in the late nineteenth century Netherlands) understood and practiced spiritual formation in order to prepare its members for civic life. It reflects on how the distinctive understanding of public life in the tradition shaped these practices and suggests that this helps to explain the contemporary situation of the movement.</p> Michael DeMoor (Author) Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/20143 Fri, 14 May 2021 00:00:00 +0000 Getting Paid and Paying Attention https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/20144 <p>This essay explores some of the theological and economic presuppositions at work in the advocacy for Universal or Guaranteed Basic Income arising from the COVID-19 pandemic. This is not to undermine the movement toward basic income, but to use this development – including the churches’ involvement therein – as a starting point to ask certain theological questions about the way in which this intervention has been configured in neoliberal capitalism. We argue that this intervention can serve as an individualized remedy to a growing, and ubiquitous, social and economic need as the gap between rich and poor expands. This is a logic and strategy that is commonplace in neoliberal capitalism as it denies public goods and government responsibility in favour of privatization and individual consumptive “freedom.” This essay examines the ways in which neoliberalism offers its own theological account of individual freedom, which is itself a secularized form of Christian anthropology.</p> Jane Barter, David Driedger (Author) Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/20144 Fri, 14 May 2021 00:00:00 +0000 "He was indeed the son of a bird": Post-biblical Jewish tradition on using ornithomancy in the Midianite war against the Israelites (Num. 25:17-18) https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/1589 Messages and signs received from animals were used to predict the future since ancient times. The ancestors believed that animal behavior, especially the voices or flight of fowls, indicates what is going to occur, whether success or failure. The current study deals with two post-biblical interpretations of the utilization of birds for divination (ornithomancy) in the biblical story of the Midianite war against the Israelites (Num. 25:17-18). The Sifre claims that the Midianites used birds in their war against Israel. The Sifre perceives ornithomancy to be an artful and devious method of combat, whose use had implications for the harsh fate that befell the Israelites. According to Sefer ha-Zohar, Balak was a magician who used bird techniques in order to be aware of his situation during the war. When his own bird communicated to him that he could not face the people of Israel he looked to Balaam for help. Abraham Ofir Shemesh (Author) Copyright (c) 2019 Religious Studies and Theology https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/1589 Sun, 19 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +0000