Religious Studies and Theology https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST <p>For forty years <em>Religious Studies and Theology</em> has published thoughtful, peer-reviewed original research with significance to the inter-related disciplines of Religious Studies and Theology. <a href="https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/about">Learn more.</a></p> Equinox Publishing Ltd. en-US Religious Studies and Theology 0829-2922 <p>© Equinox Publishing Ltd.</p> <p>For information regarding our Open Access policy, <a title="Open access policy." href="Full%20details of our conditions related to copyright can be found by clicking here.">click here</a>.</p> Circles of Conversation https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/19017 <p>Guest Editors’ Foreword</p> Jean-Pierre Fortin Jane Barter Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-12-18 2020-12-18 39 2 139–144 139–144 10.1558/rsth.42155 Reasoning God https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/19025 <p>In this Presidential Address I consider the vocation of the theologian. In the busy-ness of teaching, research and especially administrative work, our calling to the discipline of theology is easily overlooked. I offer examples of theologians and artists who speak of their vocation as more than career or even profession. Teaching the essential hard work of hope and theological diligence sets up our students to make constructive difference in their own fields. Maintaining a robust, encouraging, professional association in the Canadian Theological Society ensures the enhancement of our vocation. The occasion of this address, the sixty-fourth Annual General Meeting of the Canadian Theological Society (CTS), is an opportunity to honour this vocation.</p> Catherine Faith MacLean Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-12-18 2020-12-18 39 2 241–248 241–248 10.1558/rsth.42182 Interreligious Dialogue as Language Negotiation https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/19023 <p>This article expresses suspicion over theories and theologies of dialogue that slip too easily into explanations of dialogue as neutral information exchange between dialogue partners. Such an understanding ignores evolving historical developments in dialogues as well as the history of colonialism that shapes relationships between Christians and other religious believers. The article establishes that Christians are living a new and complicated moment in the history of interreligious dialogue. Thus, a more complex model for understanding dialogue is required. Such a model would include thinking about resistance, hybridity and incompleteness of all language exchanges, and interreligious conversations in particular.</p> Darren J. Dias Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-12-18 2020-12-18 39 2 210–224 210–224 10.1558/rsth.42127 Capable or Incapable? Disability and Justification in Martha Nussbaum’s Capabilities Approach https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/19020 <p>This article evaluates Martha Nussbaum’s capabilities approach for its treatment of disability and philosophical grounding. A summary of Nussbaum’s claims on how her theory includes people with disabilities is followed by Eva Kittay’s demonstration that in Nussbaum’s approach exclusion results from the ambiguous role of human dignity. The argument then shows that Jean Porter’s appeals to virtue and human nature provide stronger philosophical grounding for making judgments about human flourishing than Nussbaum’s non-metaphysical liberalism, insufficient to account for her theory of capabilities. While Porter’s account of human nature does not escape Shane Clifton and Hans Reinders’ concerns about the exclusion of people with disabilities from the human ideal, her and John Berkman’s recovery of Thomistic ideas of infused virtue and grace do provide a more inclusive concept of the human telos.&nbsp;</p> Michael Buttrey Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-12-18 2020-12-18 39 2 177–192 177–192 10.1558/rsth.42125 Blood and Bodies https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/19018 <p>Blood, in relation to Jewish and Christian belief, is a multivalent symbol. At once an aspect of purification following ritual impurities, an aspect of impurity in relation to the Temple, and an indicator of kinship and lineage, its complexity renders its particular situational meanings all the more significant. Blood also signifies covenant with God: the blood of circumcision, the blood of the lamb, and the blood of Christ. Menstrual blood carries a very specific weight with regard to Jewish ritual purity both prior to and following the destruction of the Second Temple; women’s bodies and blood became monitored sites of inclusion and exclusion. In this paper, I engage discussions of blood in relation to female bodies and purity in Jewish and Christian history. I aim to counter historical interpretations of menstrual blood as repugnant and unclean with a feminist reading of the general Levitical understanding of blood as life.</p> Doris Kieser Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-12-18 2020-12-18 39 2 145–159 145–159 10.1558/rsth.42128 From Call to Action https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/19024 <p>This paper critiques the four calls to action found in the 2018 joint declaration by the Roman Catholic and United Church of Canada, The Hope Within Us, and challenges notions of the Church as locus of ecological awareness and action, as the sacredness of the Church has been divorced for so long from the sacredness of Earth. Using insights on ecological conversion provided by Pope Francis in Laudato Si’, a new sense of discipleship and community is fostered to create the kind of Church needed to move from call to action. In dialogue with the communities it serves, the Church emerges as a leader in the conversation for critically engaging diverse voices and perspectives, devising a way forward that advocates for the rights of peoples and of natural resources.</p> Abigail Lofte Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-12-18 2020-12-18 39 2 225–240 225–240 10.1558/rsth.42166 “Flesh that Needs to Be Loved” https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/19022 <p>#SayHerName developed in reaction to the increase of police brutality cases that name black women as victims, signifying a pervasive issue. Interrogating the legacy of the black female body in North America, this article proposes a theology of beauty that considers black women as a primary subject. Theological aesthetics is not only a philosophical concern but represents a starting place for problematizing how black humanity is often excluded. Drawing on African American literary traditions and reflections from black Catholic theologians this article, primarily reflecting on events prior to 2020, argues for a theological response to systemic violence against black women’s bodies that articulates black life through theologies of beauty.</p> Chanelle Robinson Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-12-18 2020-12-18 39 2 193–209 193–209 10.1558/rsth.42186 Whose Populism? Which People? Mouffe, Girard and Lonergan in Dialogue https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/19019 <p>Chantal Mouffe argues that neoliberal “post-politics” has contributed to the rise of a populist moment marked by the re-emergence of collective identifications constitutive of what Carl Schmitt terms “the political.” Although right-wing populism exemplifies one response to post-politics, its xenophobic or exclusivist construction of “the people” represents the flipside of neoliberal globalization’s moralization of Schmitt’s friend/enemy distinction. In her efforts to overcome this stalemate, Mouffe commends the development of an agonistic form of politics that widens democratic debate as well as a left populist movement focused on radicalizing the principles of liberty and equality for all. Drawing on the work of René Girard and Bernard Lonergan in this paper’s final section, I aim to confirm but also complicate Mouffe’s account of the twofold movement from antagonism to agonism and radical democracy. The fruits of this three-way conversation represent a modest first step towards the articulation of an inclusive populism.&nbsp;</p> Nicholas Olkovich Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-12-18 2020-12-18 39 2 160–176 160–176 10.1558/rsth.42161 God Over All: Divine Aseity and the Challenge of Platonism, by William Lane Craig. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/19028 <p>God Over All: Divine Aseity and the Challenge of Platonism, by William Lane Craig. Oxford University Press, 2016. 272 pp., Hb., $94. ISBN 9780198786887</p> Travis Dumsday Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-12-18 2020-12-18 39 2 255–257 255–257 10.1558/rsth.40976 The Salvation of Atheists and Catholic Dogmatic Theology, by Stephen Bullivant. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/19029 <p>The Salvation of Atheists and Catholic Dogmatic Theology, by Stephen Bullivant. Oxford University Press, 2012. 215 pp. Hb. $125. ISBN: 978-0-19-965256-3</p> Glenn B. Siniscalchi Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-12-18 2020-12-18 39 2 258–259 258–259 10.1558/rsth.41333 Thomas Berry: A Biography, by Mary Evelyn Tucker, John Grim, and Andrew Angyal. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/19027 <p>Thomas Berry: A Biography, by Mary Evelyn Tucker, John Grim, and Andrew Angyal. Columbia University Press, 2019. xviii + 339 pp. Hb., $38.00. ISBN: 978-0231176989</p> Christopher Hrynkow Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-12-18 2020-12-18 39 2 252–254 252–254 10.1558/rsth.40977 The Church and Indigenous Peoples in the Americas: In Between Reconciliation and Decolonization, edited by Michel Andraos. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/RST/article/view/19026 <p>The Church and Indigenous Peoples in the Americas: In Between Reconciliation and Decolonization, edited by Michel Andraos. Cascade, 2019. xii + 241 pp., Pb., $50. ISBN 978-1-5326-3113-9</p> Robert McKeon Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-12-18 2020-12-18 39 2 249–251 249–251 10.1558/rsth.40477