https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/issue/feed Religions of South Asia 2021-03-04T14:28:40+00:00 Simon Brodbeck, Dermot Killingley, Anna King Anna.King@winchester.ac.uk Open Journal Systems <p><em>RoSA</em>&nbsp;publishes papers by internationally respected scholars on some of the most vibrant and dynamic religious traditions of the world. It includes the latest research on distinctively South Asian or Indic religions - Hindu, Jaina, Buddhist and Sikh - religions which continue to influence the patterns of thought and ways of life of millions of people.</p> https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/19010 Editorial 2021-01-08T10:22:36+00:00 Simon Brodbeck brodbecksp@cardiff.ac.uk Dermot Killingley d.h.killingley@ncl.ac.uk Anna King anna.king@winchester.ac.uk 2021-03-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/19011 Patrilocality in the Harivamsa’s Visnuparvan 2021-01-08T10:29:51+00:00 Simon Brodbeck brodbecksp@cardiff.ac.uk <p>This article suggests that the principle of patrilocality, as espoused by Krsna and Baladeva, can be applied as an interpretive frame to almost all of the narrative material that Vaisampayana presents to Janamejaya in the Harivamsa’s Visnuparvan (Hv 46–113), and that the principle of patrilocality is thus a key theme of the Visnuparvan, with Krsna and Baladeva as its heroes. This suggestion is supported by an overview of the Visnuparvan’s narrative from beginning to end, in eleven sections which repeatedly feature—or can be interpreted to feature—conflict with in-law families about where a couple will have children, and which of the two families the children will be raised for.</p> 2021-03-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/19012 Raising Rajas in Hathayoga and Beyond 2021-01-08T10:37:17+00:00 Ruth Westoby ruth_westoby@soas.ac.uk <p>This article discusses the concept of rajas in the Hathayoga corpus and compares it with material in Ayurveda and Daoism. Rajas is the red blood of menstruation, female sexual fluid, and one aspect of a gendered binary with bindu or semen. In texts deriving from a male celibate context, rajas occurs within male practitioners without the interaction of a woman. In some paradigms of the yogic body, bindu is drawn upwards and preserved alongside rajas using the technique of vajrolimudra, conferring success (siddhi) and immortality (amrta). Women appear infrequently in Hatha texts, but those who preserve their rajas are said to be yoginis. Rajas in Ayurveda functions in embryology as a vital essence, thus explaining its power in Hathayoga. Daoist materials are more detailed and cohesive than Hatha, and female inner alchemy (Nüdan) describes a practice of voluntary amenorrhea, ‘slaying the crimson dragon’—the halting of menstruation. The Daoist model enables an interpretation of the scant Hatha sources to suggest that yoginis who preserve their rajas potentially halt their periods.</p> 2021-03-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/19013 The Yoni of Kamakhya 2021-01-08T10:47:07+00:00 Paolo E. Rosati paoloe.rosati@gmail.com <p>The mythology of the yoni of Sati was introduced in the early medieval Kalikapurana (ninth–eleventh century ce), a sakta text that linked the sexual symbol of the Goddess to the Kamakhya-pitha in Assam. This article will analyse the medieval Puranas and Tantras compiled in northeastern India—focusing on their mythological accounts of the cosmogony of the yoni pitha—in order to outline a historical evolution of the yoni symbol through the Middle Ages. Combining leftist Freudian, post-structuralist and post-gender theories with religious studies, the yoni will be considered both as a source of power and as a battlefield of sex–gender identity. In conclusion, this article will challenge the idea of a static yoni but will underline a sex–gender evolution of its identity, which encompasses and transcends both male and female powers.</p> 2021-03-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/19014 Who by Fire 2021-01-08T10:51:37+00:00 Ofer Peres ofer.peres@mail.huji.ac.il <p>The Pururava-caritai (‘The Adventures of Pururavas’) is an unstudied sixteenth-century Tamil adaptation of the famous Vedic legend of Pururavas, which introduces an extensive addition to the original story. One episode within this supplement narrates a trial by fire gone through by the protagonist’s wife, which draws heavily on a similar episode from the Ramayana epic, both in Valmiki’s classical Sanskrit version and in Kampan’s twelfth-century Tamil retelling. This article sheds new light on the ways in which classical literary gender roles and gender models were reimagined in premodern south India. I argue that the re-articulation of the epic fire-ordeal in the Pururava-caritai is a critical reflection on the feminine model that the Ramayana heroine, Sita, represents. I show that, through a synthesis of classical and folk motifs, the author has created an implicit intertextual dialogue that concludes with a complex matrix of values of ‘proper’ femininity and ‘true’ divinity.</p> 2021-03-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/19015 Gender Constructions in the Theological Dimension of the Sufi Premakhyans 2021-01-08T10:55:25+00:00 Annalisa Bocchetti bocchetti.annalisa16@gmail.com <p>Through the analysis of the Citravali (1613 ce) by Usman, this article explores the interrelation between aesthetics, gender and religion within the Indian Sufi romances (premakhyans) in Avadhi language. These narratives reinterpret the Sufi semantics of love, narrating the quest of the hero in yogic disguise in search of the heroine, portrayed as a divine woman. Usman creatively reimagines the heroine of his romance as an artist, drawing on this motif to trace the allegory of creation as divine art. Therefore, this article identifies conventional aesthetic patterns in Usman’s narrative reproducing relevant gender dynamics, such as the eroticized and yet idealized image of the heroine in relation to the hero’s spiritual growth, contrasting with the escalation of the villain’s sexual desire. The traditional Hindu setting of the story broadly reflects the socio-cultural norms of the North Indian world in early modern times, and implies gender hierarchies established by the local society. The intersection of these points in the Citravali suggests further reflections on the articulation of gender in a rich branch of Sufi literature composed in a regional language of India, which may open new perspectives in the interpretation of the relationship between mysticism and eroticism.</p> 2021-03-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/19278 City of Mirrors: Songs of Lalan Sai, text, translation and commentary by Carol Salomon, edited by Keith E. Cantu and Saymon Zakaria. 2021-02-08T08:23:17+00:00 Carola Lorea aricar@nus.edu.sg <p>City of Mirrors: Songs of Lalan Sai, text, translation and commentary by Carol Salomon, edited by Keith E. Cantu and Saymon Zakaria. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017. xxxiv + 611 pp., £117.50 (hb). ISBN 9780190680220.</p> 2021-03-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/19279 Impersonations: The Artifice of Brahmin Masculinity in South Indian Dance, by Harshita Mruthinti Kamath 2021-02-08T08:34:42+00:00 Narasingha P. Sil siln@wou.edu <p>Impersonations: The Artifice of Brahmin Masculinity in South Indian Dance, by Harshita Mruthinti Kamath. Oakland, CA: University of California Press, 2019. xv + 225 pp., $34.95 (pb). ISBN 9780520301665.</p> 2021-03-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/19280 Conceiving the Indian Buddhist Patriarchs, by Stuart H. Young. 2021-02-08T08:38:25+00:00 Herman Tull hermantull@gmail.com <p>Conceiving the Indian Buddhist Patriarchs, by Stuart H. Young. Honolulu, HI: University of Hawaii Press, 2015. ix + 338 pp., $60.00 (hb). ISBN 9780824841201.</p> 2021-03-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd.