https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/issue/feed Religions of South Asia 2021-09-21T15:19:43+00:00 Simon Brodbeck, Dermot Killingley, Anna King Anna.King@winchester.ac.uk Open Journal Systems <p><em>RoSA</em> publishes papers by internationally respected scholars on some of the most vibrant and dynamic religious traditions of the world. It includes the latest research on distinctively South Asian or Indic religions - Hindu, Jaina, Buddhist and Sikh - religions which continue to influence the patterns of thought and ways of life of millions of people. <a href="https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/about">Learn more about this journal.</a></p> https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/19285 A Hindu Theology of Liberation: Not-Two is Not One, by Anantanand Rambachan. 2021-09-21T15:19:43+00:00 Vishwa Adluri vadluri@hunter.cuny.edu <p>A Hindu Theology of Liberation: Not-Two is Not One, by Anantanand Rambachan. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 2015. xi + 230 pp. £74.94 (hb), £23.50 (pb). ISBN 978-1-4384-5455-9 (hb), ISBN 978-1-4384-5456-6 (pb).</p> 2021-08-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/19286 Hindu Images and their Worship with Special Reference to Vaisnavism: A Philosophical–Theological Inquiry, by Julius J. Lipner. 2021-09-21T15:19:41+00:00 Nilima Chitgopekar nilimachitgopekar@hotmail.com <p>Hindu Images and their Worship with Special Reference to Vaisnavism: A Philosophical–Theological Inquiry, by Julius J. Lipner. Abingdon: Routledge, 2017. 260pp. £120 (hb), £36.99 (pb). ISBN: 978-1-138-29113-3 (hb), ISBN: 978-0-367-42706-1 (pb).</p> 2021-08-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/19287 Buddhist Monks and the Politics of Lanka’s Civil War: Ethnoreligious Nationalism of the Sinhala Sangha and Peacemaking in Sri Lanka, 1995–2010, by Suren Raghavan. 2021-09-21T15:19:37+00:00 Michael D. Nichols mdnichols108@gmail.com <p>Buddhist Monks and the Politics of Lanka’s Civil War: Ethnoreligious Nationalism of the Sinhala Sangha and Peacemaking in Sri Lanka, 1995–2010, by Suren Raghavan. Sheffield: Equinox Press, 2016. xvii + 274 pp. £85 (hb), £26.99 (pb). ISBN 978-1-78179-078-6 (hb), ISBN 978-1-78179-574-3 (pb).</p> 2021-08-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/19327 Jaina and Brahmanical Temples and Political Processes in a Forested Frontier of Early Medieval Southwestern Bengal 2021-09-21T15:19:28+00:00 Birendra Nath Prasad bnprasad@mail.jnu.ac.in <p>In a significant section of available scholarship on pre-Islamic Bengal, a dominant tendency has been to generalize the patterns of historical trajectories of the great river valleys. This has resulted in many discrepancies, particularly in the context of the plateau-like portions of southwestern Bengal, where, unlike other parts of Bengal, Jainism came to have an entrenched presence during the early medieval period (c.600–1200 ce). Through an analysis of the published archaeological data, this paper attempts to study the social history of Jaina and Brahmanical temples and their linkages with the political processes in a forested frontier of early medieval southwestern Bengal: Purulia. This district, marked with an absence of early historical farming cultures, was an extension of the Chhotanagpur plateau of Jharkhand. During the early medieval period, this district witnessed three coeval and interrelated processes: large-scale construction of Jaina and Brahmanical (primarily Saiva) temples, emergence of a local state, and widespread construction of hero stones. The political elites of the major political centre of the local state that emerged in this area seem to have derived their legitimacy by patronizing Saiva temples, but Jaina temples seem to have provided the primary avenue for the legitimation of local heroes after their death, who were immortalized in hero stones. </p> 2021-08-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/19325 The Co(s)mic Vision 2021-09-21T15:19:34+00:00 Siegfried J. Babajee siegfriedjeremy.bbj@gmail.com <p>The Bhagavata Purana (BhP) is a popular sacred Sanskrit text characterized by its devotion for Krsna and the many narratives concerning him and his incarnations. These narratives have an edifying quality. A great number of them bring their point across through the use of humour. Though the comic tradition of India has been covered by scholars, such studies primarily discuss the performing arts. I argue that there is a strong presence of humour in the BhP, and that this humour communicates a playful attitude which has a prominent place in the overall religiosity of the BhP, thus communicating a worldview I term the co(s)mic vision. This study contributes to the discussion on the ludic dimensions of religious traditions and indicates how religious discourse is established through the entertaining and edifying effects of humour. Narrative is used as an entertaining alternative to religious instruction as exhortation, theological assertion, or propositional excursuses.</p> 2021-08-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/19329 Sufi Shrine as Space of Hegemonic Struggle in Pakistan 2021-09-21T15:19:19+00:00 Seemab Zahra seemab.zehra@ymail.com Muhammad Bilal anth.fjwu@gmail.com Shafia Azam azam.shafia@gmail.com <p>In the post-9/11 period, while the rise of the Taliban and their alliance with Al-Qaeda accelerated radicalism in Pakistan, Sufism and Sufi shrines have been awarded the status of an antidote to counter the extremist propensities of orthodox Islam typically associated with mosques and madrasas. Nevertheless, contrary to popular belief, sectarian schism, loathing and violence have also been witnessed at several Sufi shrines across Pakistan. The article explores the dynamics of power struggle at the shrine of Bari Imam in Islamabad, Pakistan, while examining the role of sectarian conflicts and violence in achieving the desire for social and economic hegemony. Ethnographic research design was employed, involving participant observation while partaking in different activities of the shrine. Also, respondents including members of the Auqaf Department, pilgrims, caretaker(s) of the Bari Imam shrine and inhabitants of the area were interviewed. The respondents include both males and females of diverse age groups belonging to various socio-economic statuses, sectarian affiliation and educational backgrounds. The findings propose that regardless of the spiritual character of the Bari Imam shrine, it has become a pivot of economic and political power struggle, eventually engendering and escalating sectarian discord, violence and detestation.</p> 2021-08-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/19328 Right to Pray 2021-09-21T15:19:24+00:00 Ivy Dhar ivydhar@gmail.com <p>Focusing on cultural restrictions on women’s access to the garbhagriha in specific Hindu temples in India, this paper attempts to contextualize the wider debates around gender in faith-based practices and the confrontation between the ‘right to pray’ movement and its opponents. It reviews the complexities of practising public religion in a democratic nation. In the ambit of the contemporary feminist movement, activism has been initiated for reclaiming space for women in the realm of religion and faith. This was most clearly demonstrated in the women-led right to pray movement. The movement has been continuously evolving in local spaces and remains diversified across public places of worship. Debates around the exclusion of women have required the judiciary to reinterpret the relation between public temples and the equality proclaimed by the Constitution. By looking at the Sabarimala and Shani Shingnapur temple protests, this paper reflects on the conflict between activism and faith traditions. It charts the legal outcomes, local responses, political tensions, and the associated gender subjectivity. It attempts to revisit the role of women as recipients rather than agents of religion in public spaces, while extending the arguments to other aspects of ritual.</p> 2021-08-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/ROSA/article/view/19326 Editorial 2021-09-21T15:19:31+00:00 Simon Brodbeck brodbecksp@cardiff.ac.uk Dermot Killingley d.h.killingley@ncl.ac.uk Anna King anna.king@winchester.ac.uk 2021-08-04T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd.