Postscripts: The Journal of Sacred Texts, Cultural Histories, and Contemporary Contexts https://journal.equinoxpub.com/POST <p>This journal is devoted to the academic study of scripture around the globe and is the official journal of SCRIPT, the <a href="http://script-site.net/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Society for Research on Iconic and Performative Texts</a>. It deals with the rich panoply of engagements with texts that are foundational in the lives of individuals and communities around the world -- texts that travel under the name of 'scripture' or 'sacred' text. It aims to open up the discussion of sacred texts by crossing traditional boundaries, bringing different disciplinary tools to the process of analysis, and opening up a sustained dialogue between and among scholars and others who are interested in religion, textuality, media and mediation and the contemporary world. <a href="https://journal.equinoxpub.com/POST/about">Learn more about this journal.</a></p> en-US <p>© Equinox Publishing Ltd.</p> <p>For information regarding our Open Access policy, <a title="Open access policy." href="Full%20details of our conditions related to copyright can be found by clicking here.">click here</a>.</p> brad.anderson@dcu.ie (Brad Anderson) aparkin@equinoxpub.com (Ailsa Parkin) Wed, 27 Jul 2022 22:26:24 +0000 OJS 3.3.0.11 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Richard Ovenden, Burning the Books: A History of Knowledge Under Attack. London: John Murray (2020) https://journal.equinoxpub.com/POST/article/view/20322 <p>Richard Ovenden, Burning the Books: A History of Knowledge Under Attack. London: John Murray (2020)</p> Katherine E Brown Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/POST/article/view/20322 Wed, 27 Jul 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Biblical Apocrypha in South-Eastern Europe and Related Areas (Proceedings of the Session held at the 12th International Congress of South-East European Studies [Bucharest, 2–6 September 2019]), edited by Maria Cioata, Anissava Miltenova and Emanuela Timotin. Editura Istros, Braila (2021) https://journal.equinoxpub.com/POST/article/view/22756 <p>Biblical Apocrypha in South-Eastern Europe and Related Areas (Proceedings of the Session held at the 12th International Congress of South-East European Studies [Bucharest, 2–6 September 2019]), edited by Maria Cioata, Anissava Miltenova and Emanuela Timotin. Editura Istros, Braila (2021)</p> Vasile Condrea Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/POST/article/view/22756 Wed, 27 Jul 2022 00:00:00 +0000 The Bible, the Trump Presidency and the Politics of Exegesis https://journal.equinoxpub.com/POST/article/view/20855 <p>The presidency of Donald Trump exposed and amplified dynamics long active in American religion. Although the overwhelming support of evangelical Christians took many by surprise due to his unconventional religious qualifications, scholars have increasingly established that this political alliance reflects numerous well-established commitments. Accordingly, this study analyses the function of the Bible in the rhetoric of Trump’s Christian supporters. Among those surveyed, fundamentalist assumptions of biblical authority and inerrancy are held in common even while the exegetical techniques deployed diverge widely from the corresponding principles of “literal” interpretation and “original” meanings. Their tendencies are rather towards divinatory, even quasi-magical, appropriations of scriptural excerpts, practices attested in antiquity though less well known in American Christianity. For these political apologists, the Bible’s status approaches that of a ritual icon possessing spiritual power and conferring authority and legitimacy on those who wield it.</p> Courtney J P Friesen Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/POST/article/view/20855 Wed, 27 Jul 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Rebel Trash, Bad Objects, Prison Hell https://journal.equinoxpub.com/POST/article/view/23246 <p>This essay explores connections between the expansion of the prison industrial complex and the evangelical debate about hell in the late twentieth century. It starts from the evangelical assertion that the Valley of Hinnom, from which the idea of Gehenna emerged, was a place for burning garbage and dumping the bodies of criminals. It traces this misguided “fact” through its reception history back to Isaiah 66:24 and to the trauma and loss of war that the interpretive tradition disavows. Isaiah 66 describes a favored heir at Jerusalem’s breast and an expulsed group of rebels, following a strikingly similar trajectory to Melanie Klein’s psychoanalytic object relations. The subject phantasizes violence toward those projected as persecutory bad objects that threaten safety. The essay argues that Klein’s psychic structure, analyzed by critics as colonial, is resonant with evangelical discourses of hell, as well as with colonializing practices of waste management and incarceration. A close Kleinian reading of Isaiah 66 suggests that the final verse of eternal torment for rebels encodes a hyperbolic vilification and phantasy of violence toward the prophetic community’s own bad objects. It proposes instead a more complex reading of the conflict animating the poetry and suggests that the <br />text may be read reparatively as a negotiation of loss for both sides in a situation of trauma; it welcomes the heterodox community back into the fold. Following critics of environmental racism and the domestic warfare of incarceration, it argues for decolonizing reparations that recognize the needs and desires of those most affected by idealizations of safety that do great harm. Finally, it argues that there is no reparation without understanding that we are connected to our bad objects.</p> Erin Runions Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/POST/article/view/23246 Wed, 27 Jul 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Critique of the Spirit https://journal.equinoxpub.com/POST/article/view/20894 <p>The problem of tribal casteism – of Indian Scheduled Castes (SC) partially integrated into Scheduled Tribes (ST), facing discrimination without constitutional protections as doubly subaltern – is nearly absent in scholarship. The Halis of Kangra district, in the mountainous state of Himachal Pradesh, are one such SC community. Although most identify as Gaddi, the local tribe receiving coveted ST benefits, they are politically misrecognized. Through house church ethnography, this article explores how Hali sociopolitical liminality as tribal Dalits informs their popular Protestantism. By closely attending to vernacular hermeneutics, the sociopolitical context that shapes Hali textual ideologies, and homiletic emphases on protection from malign Gaddi spirits, I argue that Hali Protestants practise transgressive resignifications. The vocational roots of Hali symbolic pollution (ploughing and exorcism) are proudly reclaimed; Gaddi pastoralism, a contested terrain of caste exclusion, is reimagined as privileging Halis; Christ as the ‘Giver of Help’ is invoked as freedom from Gaddi spiritual affliction. These interpretive practices parallel broader efforts to realign discursive and social power within the Gaddi tribe.</p> Stephen Christopher Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/POST/article/view/20894 Wed, 27 Jul 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Constructed Dialogue as Hermeneutic in Small Group Bible Study https://journal.equinoxpub.com/POST/article/view/20360 <p>Modern-day readers of the Bible continually strive to bridge what Malley (2004) terms the “historical” and “devotional” horizons of the text: to understand the scriptures contextually and to discern their relevance for daily life. Through a discourse analysis of a contemporary American Bible study’s weekly conversations, this investigation reveals a particular discursive strategy, that of animating the voice of biblical characters, as a powerful hermeneutic tool in rendering the ancient text more intelligible and relatable. Voicing biblical characters, an instance of what Tannen (2007) terms “constructed dialogue,” enables contemporary readers to posit different inner mental states, motivations and attitudes of biblical characters which explain their actions while also rendering the narrative more vivid. Additionally, constructed dialogue enables readers to perform potential explanations for troublesome passages without claiming assent to them.</p> Joshua Kraut Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/POST/article/view/20360 Wed, 27 Jul 2022 00:00:00 +0000