The Quandary of Contemporary Pagan Archives

Authors

  • Garth Reese Claremont Graduate University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/pome.v9i2.109

Keywords:

Pagan Studies, Paganism,

Abstract

Although religious archives as they exist today are a relatively recent development, the need to maintain a collection of materials essential to the administration of a church or other religious body emerges at the moment that body is founded/ This is especially true in the case of contemporary Pagan religious bodies, many of which, whether because they tend to be non-scriptural, or because they are smaller, younger, or less secure than mainline Christian denominations, have neither created nor maintain formal archives. ‘Archival’ materials related to these bodies tend to reside on hard drives or in file cabinets in members’ homes or offices; hardly a dependable setting for long-term preservation. Yet archives are essential to gaining credibility and respectability in the greater American (even global) religious landscape. More importantly, they allow religious bodies to retain control over their own histories, which is essential for small, sometimes threatened, groups like contemporary Pagans.

Author Biography

Garth Reese, Claremont Graduate University

Garth Reese is the coordinator of digital initiatives for special collections at the University of Oklahoma library and a PhD candidate in Religion at Claremont Graduate University. His dissertation considers the intersections of occult philosophies and theology in seventeenth-century English thought through the person of Thomas Vaughan, better known to alchemists as Eugenius Philalethes.

References

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Cafardi, Nicholas P. “Discovering the Secret Archives: Evidentiary Privileges for Church Records.” Journal of Law and Religion 10.1 (1993–94): 95-120. doi:10.2307/1051170.

Daniels, Maygene F., and Timothy Walch, eds. A Modern Archives Reader: Basic Readings on Archival Theory and Practice (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 1984).

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Internet Resources

Assembly of the Sacred Wheel, http://www.sacredwheel.org/

Circle Sanctuary, http://www.circlesanctuary.org/

Covenant of the Goddess, http://www.cog.org/

New Alexandria Library and Resource Center, http://www.magusbooks.com /newalexandria/

New Alexandrian Library Project, http://www.sacredwheel.org/nal.html

New Reformed Orthodox Order of the Golden Dawn, http://www.nroogd.org/

Reclaiming, http://www.reclaiming.org/

Wiccan Church of Minnesota, http://www.wiccanchurchmn.org/

Witches’ Voice, http://www.witchvox.com/xtwv.html

Published

2007-12-17

How to Cite

Reese, G. (2007). The Quandary of Contemporary Pagan Archives. Pomegranate, 9(2), 109–120. https://doi.org/10.1558/pome.v9i2.109

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Section

Articles