Pagans and Museums

Approaching the Ancestors

Authors

  • Will Rathouse MOLA

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/pome.21357

Keywords:

Druids, Druidry, Reburial, Ancestors, Stonehenge, skeletons, heritage, museums

Abstract

Inspired by post-colonial restitution campaigns for return of Ancestral bones, British Druids campaigned for the reburial of skeletons and other corporeal relics in museums and at heritage sites. This article briefly analyses the ideas behind and the conduct of these campaigns situating them within the traditions of contemporary British Druidry.

Author Biography

Will Rathouse, MOLA

Will Rathouse (PhD, University of Wales Lampeter) organized archaeological activities for mental health service users at Mind Aberystwyth. He now works for the Museum of London Archaeology on the Thames Discovery Programme, arranging foreshore archaeology activities for older Londoners, veterans, and Londoners living with mental health difficulties.

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Published

2022-04-06

How to Cite

Rathouse, W. . (2022). Pagans and Museums: Approaching the Ancestors. Pomegranate, 23(1-2), 157–165. https://doi.org/10.1558/pome.21357