Popular Music History https://journal.equinoxpub.com/PMH <p><em>Popular Music History</em> publishes original historical and historiographical research that draws on the wide range of disciplines and intellectual trajectories that have contributed to the establishment of popular music studies as a recognized academic enterprise. <a href="https://journal.equinoxpub.com/PMH/about">Learn more about this journal.</a></p> Equinox Publishing Ltd. en-US Popular Music History 1740-7133 <p>© Equinox Publishing Ltd.</p> <p>For information regarding our Open Access policy, <a title="Open access policy." href="Full%20details of our conditions related to copyright can be found by clicking here.">click here</a>.</p> Tyler Bickford, Tween Pop: Children’s Music and Public Culture. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/PMH/article/view/22929 <p>Tyler Bickford, Tween Pop: Children’s Music and Public Culture. Durham, NC and London: Duke University Press. 2020. 240 pp. ISBN 978-1-4780-0819-4 (pbk). $25.95.</p> Liam Maloy Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-06-23 2022-06-23 14 3 283 286 10.1558/pomh.22929 Richard Lysons, Were You There? Popular Music at Manchester’s Free Trade Hall, 1951–1996. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/PMH/article/view/22611 <p>Richard Lysons, Were You There? Popular Music at Manchester’s Free Trade Hall, 1951–1996. Manchester: Empire Publications, 2020. 272 pp. ISBN 9781909360815 (hbk). £20.00.</p> Ray Kinsella Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-06-23 2022-06-23 14 3 287 290 10.1558/pomh.22611 Stephen Sedley and Martin Carthy, Who Killed Cock Robin?: British Folk Songs of Crime and Punishment. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/PMH/article/view/21838 <p>Stephen Sedley and Martin Carthy, Who Killed Cock Robin?: British Folk Songs of Crime and Punishment. London: Reaktion Books / English Folk Dance and Song Society, 2021. 280 pp. ISBN 978-1789145038 (hbk). £14.99.</p> Jon Stewart Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-06-23 2022-06-23 14 3 291 294 10.1558/pomh.21838 Kenneth McAlpine, Bits and Pieces: A History of Chiptunes. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/PMH/article/view/21017 <p>Kenneth McAlpine, Bits and Pieces: A History of Chiptunes. New York. Oxford University Press, 2019. 308 pp. ISBN 9780190496104 (pbk). £25.49.</p> Daniel Milosavljevic Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-06-23 2022-06-23 14 3 295 298 10.1558/pomh.21017 Why doesn’t anyone write anything about Slade? Reassessing glam https://journal.equinoxpub.com/PMH/article/view/20527 <p>This article addresses critical neglect of 1970s UK glam rock group Slade. It argues that from the 1970s on, especially in music media, class conflict was increasingly rearticulated in terms of musical taste through multicultural capital. This revision of Bourdieu privileges cultural omnivorism as key to social status, a tolerance that embraces potentially all music except that most strongly identified with low cultural capital, i.e. heavy metal and pop music, and their associated audiences (working-class males and teenyboppers). The fact that these were Slade’s core audiences guaranteed the group’s long-term marginalization. Class politics were re-articulated as identity politics. Multicultural capital and cultural omnivorism are significant to the construction of neoliberal individualism, and David Bowie, the dominant presence in critical accounts of glam, is discussed as an example of that tendency. My interest then, is less in how working-class (or teenybop) the Slade audience was, and more in how those identifications led to their critical marginalization. Slade went on, however, to become a primary influence on glam metal, and the UK, US and Australia are discussed as examples of scenes in which the group contributed to or interacted with in diverse ways, revealing a unique set of interactions both with mainstream popular music in the one hand, and subcultures on the other.</p> Matthew Bannister Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-06-23 2022-06-23 14 3 227 246 10.1558/pomh.20527 ‘I am he as you are he as you are me and we are all together’ https://journal.equinoxpub.com/PMH/article/view/19863 <p>Seeing Henry Jenkins’s digital-age concept of transmedia convergence as the late-capitalist assembly of 1960s psychedelic intermedia practices, this article adds to a discussion of pre-digital convergence through an examination of the Beatles’ countercultural media production and distribution practices. This research examines how these practices are indicative of their cultural ideologies, and how and why these seemingly countercultural beliefs were vulnerable to (and actively complicit in) the formation of neoliberal movements of the digital age. This work finds the psychedelic values held by members of the Beatles to have shaped their song lyrics, distribution, business model and branding in ways that function effectively similar to Jenkins’s notion of ‘transmedia storytelling’. The result primes audiences for the consumer practices and subjectivity of the postmodern condition. This is accomplished by dispersing narratives and iconography across Beatles’ content such that all texts contribute to an oceanic network while lacking any ‘core’ texts</p> Maxim Tvorun-Dunn Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-06-23 2022-06-23 14 3 247–267 247–267 10.1558/pomh.19863 On the borders of ska https://journal.equinoxpub.com/PMH/article/view/18872 <p>On Tales from the Border: Skank for Choice (2019), a benefit album to support local reproductive rights organizations in Rio Grande Valley, Texas band L@s Skagaler@s position their music and ska in general as an explicitly activist space. Despite calling the album and accompanying concert ‘ska themed’, musically, the album features little of ska’s elements: upstroke rhythms, prominent brass and walking bass lines—the hallmarks of ska music—are all absent. Instead, the album offers three hardcore tracks, before the band’s drummer takes center stage and delivers three bilingual hip-hop songs. This article seeks to understand what ‘ska’ as a signifier means in this context. It posits that L@s Skagaler@s utilizes double meanings, such as ‘skank’ in the title and a feminist pseudonym, to gesture toward both ska’s history and feminist activism. Ultimately, this highlights the anti-racist and anti-colonial moments in the genre’s history, while also posing a corrective to the depoliticized ‘third-wave ska’ sound.</p> Steven Stendebach Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-06-23 2022-06-23 14 3 268–282 268–282 10.1558/pomh.18872