Perfect Beat https://journal.equinoxpub.com/PB <p><em>Perfect Beat</em>&nbsp;first appeared in July 1992 and has been published by Equinox since 2009.&nbsp;<br>The journal's name derived from Afrika Bambaata and the Soul Sonic Force's 12-inch, 1983 single&nbsp;<em>Looking for the Perfect Beat</em>. As befits a journal originating in Australia, the journal remains focused on the popular music of the 'Pacific rim' and includes historical and contemporary studies with contributions invited from popular music studies, musicology, cultural studies and ethnomusicological perspectives.</p> Equinox Publishing Ltd. en-US Perfect Beat 1038-2909 <p>© Equinox Publishing Ltd.</p> <p>For information regarding our Open Access policy, <a title="Open access policy." href="Full%20details of our conditions related to copyright can be found by clicking here.">click here</a>.</p> Editorial introduction https://journal.equinoxpub.com/PB/article/view/18381 Shelley Brunt Oli Wilson Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-09-22 2020-09-22 20 1 5–7 5–7 10.1558/prbt.41812 Richard Elliott. 2015. <i>The Late Voice: Time, Age and Experience in Popular Music.</i> https://journal.equinoxpub.com/PB/article/view/18387 <p>Richard Elliott. 2015. &lt;i&gt;The Late Voice: Time, Age and Experience in Popular Music.&lt;/i&gt;&nbsp;New York and London: Bloomsbury Academic.</p> Anna Szemere Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-09-22 2020-09-22 20 1 99–100 99–100 10.1558/prbt.39569 Matt Brennan. 2017. <i>When Genres Collide: Down Beat, Rolling Stone, and the Struggle between Jazz and Rock.</i> https://journal.equinoxpub.com/PB/article/view/18388 <p>Matt Brennan. 2017. &lt;i&gt;When Genres Collide: Down Beat, Rolling Stone, and the Struggle between Jazz and Rock.&lt;/i&gt;&nbsp;New York and London: Bloomsbury.</p> Brent Keogh Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-09-22 2020-09-22 20 1 101–104 101–104 10.1558/prbt.41813 Toby Martin. 2015. <i>Yodelling Boundary Riders: Country Music in Australia since the 1920s.</i> https://journal.equinoxpub.com/PB/article/view/18389 <p>Toby Martin. 2015. &lt;i&gt;Yodelling Boundary Riders: Country Music in Australia since the 1920s.&lt;/i&gt;&nbsp;Melbourne: Lyrebird Press.</p> Natalie Rhook Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-09-22 2020-09-22 20 1 105–106 105–106 10.1558/prbt.39570 Experiences and perceptions of gender in the Australian music industry https://journal.equinoxpub.com/PB/article/view/18382 <p>This article reports results from an online survey (n=207) about experiences and perceptions of gender from those working in the Australian music industry. Taking a feminist approach, theory on gender and hegemonic masculinity is used to discuss power in a gendered context in this industry. Literature shows women and girls experience a range of difficulties in the music industry worldwide, such as negative assumptions about their skill levels. The small body of research on gender and the Australian music industry has discussed topics such as the forgetting of women in Australian popular music history. Results reported in this article show that women’s worst experiences most often related to sexual violence or unwanted sexual advances; and men’s most often related to money. Findings contribute to the field by providing gendered analysis of self-reported data in an under-researched industry.</p> Hannah Mary Fairlamb Bianca Fileborn Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-09-22 2020-09-22 20 1 8–39 8–39 10.1558/prbt.39800 Not given lightly https://journal.equinoxpub.com/PB/article/view/18383 <p>This article examines punk/indie scenes in 1970s–80s Aotearoa/New Zealand (NZ) in terms of dominant punk discourses of youth ‘resistance’, independence from mainstream values and commercial institutions, and questioning musical meaning. In line with Frith, it aims to show how these discourses were complicated if not contradicted in practice, partly due to their reembedding in settler colonies like NZ, where punk/indie became associated with traditional settler values of white masculinity in ‘pure’ natural settings, on the one hand, while also echoing high modernist discourses authenticating local culture as independent of foreign influence, again drawing on gendered discourse. Chris Knox and the Dunedin Sound are the main examples discussed. The rise of creative industries discourses in the early 2000s served to highlight competing definitions of local music in relation to national identity, as tensions arose between punk/indie’s self-identification with Pakeha masculine ‘authenticity’, and emergent constructions of New Zealand music as popular, commercial and also more gender and ethnically diverse.</p> Matthew Bannister Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-09-22 2020-09-22 20 1 40 67 10.1558/prbt.39470 ‘Nonagon infinity opens the door!’ https://journal.equinoxpub.com/PB/article/view/18385 <p>The re-use of motifs is relatively common as a method of structuring concept albums. These motifs can appear in several different formats, but generally are musical or lyrical references that serve to generate a sense of cohesion across a release. Australian band King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard have created what is referred to as the ‘Gizzverse‘—a collection of musical, lyrical and extra-musical motifs that are referenced across several releases. Their extensive re-use of motifs, discussed using Gérard Genette’s frameworks for understanding multi-textual references, or transtextuality, creates an interconnected mythology that this article argues ultimately constitutes a kind of uber-concept album.</p> Paul Ballam-Cross Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-09-22 2020-09-22 20 1 68–91 68–91 10.1558/prbt.38104 Is this the real life? Is this just fantasy? Rocketman (2019) and Bohemian Rhapsody (2018) https://journal.equinoxpub.com/PB/article/view/18386 <p>In this RIFF article, the author provides a contextual discussion of two widely publicized music biopics, Rocketman (2019) about Elton John, and Bohemian Rhapsody (2018) about Queen. The films portray the life and careers of similarly canonized popular music artists and, through a blending of nostalgia and escapism, each film invokes popular music as a vehicle for personal transformation. Alison Blair explores how these films apply different storytelling devices to offer historical and contemporary insights into the broader intersection between popular music and sexual politics.</p> Alison Blair Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-09-22 2020-09-22 20 1 92–98 92–98 10.1558/prbt.39752