Journal of Skyscape Archaeology https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA <p><em>The Journal of Skyscape Archaeology</em> (<em>JSA</em>) is concerned with the role and importance of the sky in the interpretation of the material record. Currently, elements of this study can be found separately in the disciplines of archaeoastronomy, archaeology, cultural astronomy, anthropology and history. <em>JSA </em>brings them together under the aegis of a new academic journal in order to promote cross-fertilization towards an understanding of the cosmologies of the societies who constructed and used the rich archaeological heritage we study today. <a href="https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/about">More about the journal.</a></p> en-US <p>© Equinox Publishing Ltd.</p> <p>For information regarding our Open Access policy, <a title="Open access policy." href="Full%20details of our conditions related to copyright can be found by clicking here.">click here</a>.</p> fsilva@bournemouth.ac.uk (Fabio Silva and Liz Henty) aparkin@equinoxpub.com (Ailsa Parkin) Fri, 18 Feb 2022 14:32:10 +0000 OJS 3.3.0.11 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Euan W. MacKie, Professor Challenger and his Lost Neolithic World: The Compelling Story of Alexander Thom and British Archaeoastronomy https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/22278 <p>Euan W. MacKie, Professor Challenger and his Lost Neolithic World: The Compelling Story of Alexander Thom and British Archaeoastronomy Oxford: Archaeopress, 2020. Paperback 158 pp., 81 figures ISBN 9781784918330. £30.00.</p> Kenneth Brophy Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/22278 Fri, 18 Feb 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Peigín Doyle, Pathway To The Cosmos: The alignment of megalithic tombs in Ireland and Atlantic Europe https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/22277 <p>Peigín Doyle, Pathway To The Cosmos: The alignment of megalithic tombs in Ireland and Atlantic Europe Dublin: Wordwell Ltd., in association with National Monuments Service, 2020. Paperback, fully illustrated, 143 pp. ISBN 9781916291256. €10.00.</p> Carolyn Kennett Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/22277 Fri, 18 Feb 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Nancy Gonlin and April Nowell, Archaeology of the Night: Life after Dark in the Ancient World https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/22279 <p>Nancy Gonlin and April Nowell, Archaeology of the Night: Life after Dark in the Ancient World Boulder: University Press of Colorado, 2018. e-book, 412 pp. ISBN 9781607326786. £20.35.</p> Ingrid O’Donnell Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/22279 Fri, 18 Feb 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Efrosyni Boutsikas, Stephen C. McCluskey and John Steele (eds), Advancing Cultural Astronomy: Studies In Honour of Clive Ruggles https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/22281 <p>Efrosyni Boutsikas, Stephen C. McCluskey and John Steele (eds), Advancing Cultural Astronomy: Studies In Honour of Clive Ruggles Springer International Publishing, 2021. Hardback 319 pages, illustrated, ISBN: 978-3-030-64605-9. £109.99; eBook 978-3-030-64606-6. £87.50.</p> Liz Henty Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/22281 Fri, 18 Feb 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Books https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/22282 Liz Henty Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/22282 Fri, 18 Feb 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Forthcoming Conferences https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/22284 Liz Henty Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/22284 Fri, 18 Feb 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Software https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/22285 Fabio Silva Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/22285 Fri, 18 Feb 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Analysis of Structures’ Orientations in Archaeoastronomy https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/18109 <p>The study of structures’ orientations in archaeoastronomy often involves the analysis of the empirical sum of probability densities (SPD) for azimuths and declinations. A first logical step is to test the null hypothesis A of a random distribution of azimuths. This paper applies two methods: (1) the confidence envelope method with the azimuth SPD; and (2) binomial distribution with a probability parameter found from geometric estimates. Some empirical SPDs for which A is rejected can be composed of several subpopulations of structures with different grouping criteria. To assess the statistical significance of peaks or attractors potentially targeted to specific azimuths or declinations, a null hypothesis B is formulated. In its strong version, this hypothesis negates the existence of any attractor, while its weak version focuses on the local region of the peak without hypothesising about the rest of the SPD. This paper presents two methodologies for assessing B: (1) the method of the confidence envelope, applied to the strong version of B; and (2) a geometric method with the binomial distribution and a probability parameter estimated from the normalised frequency around the peak in the SPD (for the weak version of B). The methodology is illustrated with a case study of churches dedicated to the Virgin of the Assumption in southern Spain.</p> José M. Abril Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/18109 Fri, 18 Feb 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Cosmo-Logics in Contemporary Lowland South America https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/22275 <p>This work is an attempt to introduce a comparison of the deep logics articulating cosmovisions and cosmologies among indigenous groups in the Lowlands of South America. We are particularly interested in describing the current state and recent past of these knowledge systems, but also connecting them to the distant past. We seek to leave aside an anecdotic comparative approach focused on isolated elements, and it is not our intention to build conjectural narratives of the links among these ways of conceiving the world. Instead, we wish to focus on analysing the common underlying logics that account for the organising principles of these cosmovisions and cosmologies, related to their relational and political nature. International works very often identify the South American Lowlands with Amazonia and here we would like to correct this and include examples from Patagonia on an equal footing with those from Chaco.</p> Alejandro M. López, Agustina Altman Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/22275 Fri, 18 Feb 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Editorial https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/22321 Liz Henty, Fabio Silva, Erica Ellingson Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/22321 Fri, 18 Feb 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Following The Milky Way Path of Souls https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/18926 <p>Cahokia was a major Native American city on the east side of the Mississippi River, across from the modern-day city of St. Louis, Missouri. Cahokia flourished from c.1050 AD to c.1250. In this paper archaeoastronomic and ethnohistoric data along with computer simulations are used to explore the idea that the Cahokia site axis and the Rattlesnake Causeway were intentionally aligned to the Milky Way. It is proposed that this alignment accounts for the peculiar 5° offset of the site from the cardinal directions. Following Sarah Baires, it is suggested that Rattlesnake Causeway was a terrestrial metaphor for the Milky Way Path of Souls used by the deceased to cross to the Land of the Dead. Rattlesnake Mound at the end of the Causeway is suggested as a portal to the Path of Souls. According to ethnohistoric accounts, the Land of the Dead was guarded by a Great Serpent – suggested here as visible in the night sky as either the constellation Serpens or that of Scorpius.</p> William F. Romain Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/18926 Fri, 18 Feb 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Archaeoastronomy at the Villa de Leiva Archaeological Site, A Reinterpretation https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/17837 <p>This paper presents a study of the Villa de Leiva archaeological site in Colombia commonly known as El Infiernito, from an archaeoastronomical perspective, with efforts to incorporate only reliable positions of the stones found in the site. While the site has been archaeoastronomically researched in the past, the present research analyses the site’s larger monoliths, which have not been analysed before, and suggests new sociocultural interpretations of those stones that have been studied previously. Referring to cultural similarities between contemporary indigenous groups and the Herrera and Muisca cultures that previously occupied the site, it is suggested that the orientation of the 25 in situ columns and the big monoliths of the southern field could be related to the midpoint between solstices, known in skyscape archaeology as the spatial equinox. Religious beliefs and rituals, fertility celebrations, agriculture and climate are key factors that contribute to the understanding of this solar alignment.</p> H. Natalia Sánchez Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/17837 Fri, 18 Feb 2022 00:00:00 +0000