Journal of Skyscape Archaeology https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA <p><em>The Journal of Skyscape Archaeology</em>&nbsp;(<em>JSA</em>) is concerned with the role and importance of the sky in the interpretation of the material record. Currently, elements of this study can be found separately in the disciplines of archaeoastronomy, archaeology, cultural astronomy, anthropology and history.&nbsp;<em>JSA</em>brings them together under the aegis of a new academic journal in order to promote cross-fertilization towards an understanding of the cosmologies of the societies who constructed and used the rich archaeological heritage we study today.&nbsp;</p> Equinox Publishing Ltd. en-US Journal of Skyscape Archaeology 2055-348X <p>© Equinox Publishing Ltd.</p> <p>For information regarding our Open Access policy, <a title="Open access policy." href="Full%20details of our conditions related to copyright can be found by clicking here.">click here</a>.</p> Editorial https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/17539 Liz Henty Fabio Silva Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-03-21 2020-03-21 5 2 119 122 10.1558/jsa.40027 Gyula Priskin, <i>The Ancient Egyptian Book of the Moon: Coffin Texts Spells</i> https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/17555 <p>Gyula Priskin,&nbsp;<em>The Ancient Egyptian Book of the Moon: Coffin Texts&nbsp;</em><em>Spells</em>. 154–160. Archaeopress Egyptology 22. Oxford: Archaeopress, 2019. Paperback. ii+254 pp., 4 tables, 1 figure. ISBN: 9781789691986. £30.00.</p> Bernadette Brady Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-03-21 2020-03-21 5 2 221 226 10.1558/jsa.40393 Keith Ray and Julian Thomas, <i>Neolithic Britain: The Transformation of Social Worlds</i> https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/17556 <p>Keith Ray and Julian Thomas,&nbsp;<em>Neolithic Britain: The Transformation of Social Worlds</em>, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. Hardback, 416 pages. ISBN: 978-0-19-882389-6. £30.</p> Ingrid O’Donnell Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-03-21 2020-03-21 5 2 227 231 10.1558/jsa.40029 Patrick Vinton Kirch and Clive Ruggles, <i>Heiau ‘?ina Lani: The Hawaiian Temple System in Ancient Kahikinui and Kaup?, Maui</i> https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/17557 <p>Patrick Vinton Kirch and Clive Ruggles,&nbsp;<em>Heiau ‘?ina Lani: The Hawaiian Temple System in Ancient Kahikinui and Kaup?</em>, Maui Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2019. Hardback 384 pp. ISBN: 9780824878276. $75.00.</p> Martha H. Noyes Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-03-21 2020-03-21 5 2 232 235 10.1558/jsa.40031 Counting Demons and Devas https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/17552 <p>In the article referenced below and published earlier in Journal of Skyscape Archaeology 4(2), discussion was presented concerning the bas-relief at Angkor Wat known as the "Churning of the Ocean of Milk". The present paper clarifies certain points in the original discussion and provides additional details concerning the posited day-count between equinox and solstices as represented in the relief.</p> William F. Romain Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-03-21 2020-03-21 5 2 210 214 10.1558/jsa.39333 Supplementary Video 1 to <i>Lunar Standstills or Lunistices, Reality or Myth?</i> by A. César González-García and Juan A. Belmonte https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/17549 <p>There is an intense debate in cultural astronomy on the importance of lunar standstills in prehistory or antiquity, and even on whether this elusive and difficult-to-understand phenomenon actually was then recognised. In the present paper, we seek to address those who advocate no longer using the terms "lunar standstill" or the related "lunistice". We begin by clarifying what the concept actually involves, before highlighting some case studies where proposed orientations to lunar standstills have explanatory value and a strong likelihood, connected to the lunar nature of the deities worshipped at particular sites. Finally, we present some relevant ancient texts that indicate awareness of lunar extremes.</p> A. César González-García Juan A. Belmonte Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-03-21 2020-03-21 5 2 10.1558/jsa.41030 Supplementary Video 2 to <i>Lunar Standstills or Lunistices, Reality or Myth?</i> by A. César González-García and Juan A. Belmonte https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/17550 <p>There is an intense debate in cultural astronomy on the importance of lunar standstills in prehistory or antiquity, and even on whether this elusive and difficult-to-understand phenomenon actually was then recognised. In the present paper, we seek to address those who advocate no longer using the terms "lunar standstill" or the related "lunistice". We begin by clarifying what the concept actually involves, before highlighting some case studies where proposed orientations to lunar standstills have explanatory value and a strong likelihood, connected to the lunar nature of the deities worshipped at particular sites. Finally, we present some relevant ancient texts that indicate awareness of lunar extremes.</p> A. César González-García Juan A. Belmonte Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-03-21 2020-03-21 5 2 10.1558/jsa.41031 Lunar Standstills or Lunistices, Reality or Myth? https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/17543 <p>There is an intense debate in cultural astronomy on the importance of lunar standstills in prehistory or antiquity, and even on whether this elusive and difficult-to-understand phenomenon actually was then recognised. In the present paper, we seek to address those who advocate no longer using the terms "lunar standstill" or the related "lunistice". We begin by clarifying what the concept actually involves, before highlighting some case studies where proposed orientations to lunar standstills have explanatory value and a strong likelihood, connected to the lunar nature of the deities worshipped at particular sites. Finally, we present some relevant ancient texts that indicate awareness of lunar extremes.</p> A. César González-García Juan A. Belmonte Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-03-21 2020-03-21 5 2 177 190 10.1558/jsa.39036 A Neolithic World View Lost in Translation https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/17544 <p>This paper considers the history of interpretations of the Maltese Neolithic Temples, using the site known as the Tarxien Temples as a case study. It examines the persistence of terminology adopted by archaeologists to explain the Tarxien complex during the early and midtwentieth century, and discusses how broader social trends and perspectives on religion have determined academic and popular understandings of such sites and their cosmological aspects. The paper shows how outdated misconceptions about the Neolithic sites remain commonplace, despite the rise of more dynamic interpretations in recent years that consider the structures in more relational contexts.</p> Katya Stroud Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-03-21 2020-03-21 5 2 191 209 10.1558/jsa.40026 A Stone Pillar of a Condor Marked the Equinox at the Site of Buena Vista, Peru at 2200 BC https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/17541 <p>The thesis of this study is that a well-attested mythological trope concerning the Fox and the Condor is apparent in archaeological features at Buena Vista in Chillón Valley, a site in Peru dating to 2200 BC. The myth identifies the Fox as an observer of human ritual activities who reports them to the Condor, who in turn flies up to the animate mountain peaks (apus) to inform them of these activities. With that information, the apus mete out punishments or rewards based on whether the rituals were adequate. At Buena Vista, this is expressed by an equinoctial alignment between a temple with an incised fox and a stone pillar carved into the shape of a condor.</p> R.A. Benfer Jr. Lucio Laura Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-03-21 2020-03-21 5 2 123 150 10.1558/jsa.40025 Lunar alignments at Ur https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/17542 <p>In ancient Sumer the Moon god, Nanna, was the patron deity for the city of Ur. In this article data are presented showing how the city of Ur was astronomically aligned to the Moon. Assessments are made using satellite imagery in combination with early maps and aerial photographs. Also shown is how the geographic location of Ur relative to Nippur may be related to the Moon’s 18.6-year nodal cycle. It is also shown how lunar calendric data are likely embedded in an ancient legend that tells of the Moon god’s journey from Ur to Nippur. Together these and other lines of evidence demonstrate how one of the world’s oldest cities was shaped through its entanglement with the gods – and in particular, the Moon god Nanna.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Open Access Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives: CC BY-NC-ND</strong></p> William F. Romain Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-03-21 2020-03-21 5 2 151 176 10.1558/jsa.39074 Forthcoming Conferences https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/17558 Liz Henty Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-03-21 2020-03-21 5 2 236 236 10.1558/jsa.40032 Stonehenge Skyscape https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/17560 Sue Greaney Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-03-21 2020-03-21 5 2 239 240 10.1558/jsa.40034 Notices: Books https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/17559 Liz Henty Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-03-21 2020-03-21 5 2 237 238 10.1558/jsa.40033 “Cultural Astronomy Beyond Paradigms”. The 27th Annual Conference of the European Society of Astronomy in Culture, Bern, Switzerland, 5th–7th September 2019 https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JSA/article/view/17554 <p>.</p> Emília Pásztor Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-03-21 2020-03-21 5 2 215 220 10.1558/jsa.40028