Conversation analytic investigations of dysarthria and hearing impairment

The impact of motor and sensory impairments on social interaction

Authors

  • Ray Wilkinson University of Sheffield

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/jircd.v4i1.1

Keywords:

Linguistics, Speech Pathology

Abstract

As an introduction to this special issue on conversation analytic investigations of dysarthria and hearing impairment I provide a brief introduction to conversation analysis (CA) and discuss previous research which has used this approach to analyse dysarthria and hearing impairment. Specifically, I focus on three themes which are common to both types of interaction and which are present in the papers in this special issue: other-initiation of repair activity, overlapping talk, and interactional adaptation. Finally, some future directions for further research are highlighted, including work investigating the relationship between forms of communicative impairment and distinctive features of talk-in-interaction, and the possibility of developing interaction-focused intervention programmes for dysarthria or hearing-impairment.

Author Biography

Ray Wilkinson, University of Sheffield

Ray Wilkinson is Professor of Human Communication in the Department of Human Communication Sciences, University of Sheffield. His research interests centre on the use of conversation analysis to examine social interaction, in particular interactions involving people with communication impairments. Recent publications include papers in Research in Language and Social Interaction, Aphasiology, Discourse Processes, International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, and Journal of Pragmatics.

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Published

2013-06-20

How to Cite

Wilkinson, R. (2013). Conversation analytic investigations of dysarthria and hearing impairment: The impact of motor and sensory impairments on social interaction. Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders, 4(1), 1–26. https://doi.org/10.1558/jircd.v4i1.1

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