The Interactional Work of Repeated Talk between a Teacher and a Child with Autism

Authors

  • Terhi Kirsi Korkiakangas University of Roehampton
  • John P. Rae University of Roehampton
  • Paul Dickerson University of Roehampton

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/jircd.v3i1.1

Keywords:

Conversation Analysis, repetition, echolalia, autism, repair

Abstract

Repeating something that another speaker has just said is an important resource in everyday interaction. For example, repetition can be used to acknowledge or to repair prior talk. Although repetitions produced by individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) have been extensively researched, only a few studies have examined in detail how these individuals respond to repetitions produced by another speaker. The present report examines a naturally occurring dyadic conversation between a teacher and a 10-year-old girl with autism, video-recorded in a school in Finland. Conversation Analysis (CA) is used to analyse sequences of talk in which the child responds to repetitions produced by her teacher. We show how the child orients to the timing and prosodic features of the repetitions and responds selectively to either acknowledge or repair the teacher’s talk. We discuss how CA can contribute to a better understanding of the use of repeated talk in autism.

Author Biographies

Terhi Kirsi Korkiakangas, University of Roehampton

Terhi Korkiakangas is a social interaction researcher with a particular focus on autism spectrum disorders. Her other research interests involve eye-gaze, facial expressions, body movement, and social understanding in everyday interactions. She is lecturer in Psychology at the University of Roehampton, London.

John P. Rae, University of Roehampton

John Rae is Reader in Psychology and Director of the Centre for Research in Cognition, Emotion and Interaction, in the Department of Psychology, University of Roehampton, London. His empirical research concerns talk and body movement in social interaction. In addition to everyday interactions, he is interested in interactions involving persons with a challenged capacity (e.g. people with aphasia or with an autistic spectrum disorder) and in tele-mediated interactions and computer-mediated communication.

Paul Dickerson, University of Roehampton

Paul Dickerson is principal lecturer in Psychology at the University of Roehampton, London. His research interests encompass conversation and discourse analysis with a particular focus the analysis of interactions involving persons with an autism spectrum disorder.

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Published

2012-04-03

How to Cite

Korkiakangas, T. K., Rae, J. P., & Dickerson, P. (2012). The Interactional Work of Repeated Talk between a Teacher and a Child with Autism. Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders, 3(1), 1–25. https://doi.org/10.1558/jircd.v3i1.1

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