Journal of Islamic Archaeology https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA <p>The Journal of Islamic Archaeology is the only journal today devoted to the field of Islamic archaeology on a global scale. The term refers to the archaeological study of Islamic societies, polities, and communities, wherever they are found. It may be considered a type of “historical” archaeology, in which the study of historically (textually) known societies can be studied through a combination of “texts and tell”. <a href="https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/about">Read more</a>.</p> Equinox Publishing Ltd. en-US Journal of Islamic Archaeology 2051-9710 <p>© Equinox Publishing Ltd.</p> <p>For information regarding our Open Access policy, <a title="Open access policy." href="Full%20details of our conditions related to copyright can be found by clicking here.">click here</a>.</p> The Monastic Landscape of Adiabene in the First Centuries of Islam https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/18271 <p>The article considers the archaeological and literary evidence for Christian populations in provinceof Hadyab (Adiabene) in northern Iraq in the 5th to 9th centuries AD. We argue that there was a conspicuous expansion of settlements, both rural and urban, clustered around newly built churches, monasteries and fortifications in the 7th century. We link this to local Christian aristocrats (shahregan), who flourished under the light tax regime of the Early Caliphate and are discussed in contemporary Syriac hagiography.</p> Karel Novacek Philip Wood Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-11-07 2020-11-07 7 1 1 20 10.1558/jia.18271 The Early Islamic Pottery from the Monastery at al-Qusur https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/18272 <p>The pottery discovered at al-Qusur (Failaka Island, Kuwait) is of first importance to clarify the<br />dating of the Christian settlements of the Arab-Persian Gulf. Firstly attributed to the Sasanian<br />period by their excavators on the base of pottery and stucco studies, theses sites were then<br />attributed to the Early Islamic period by other scholars according to the artefacts published.<br />Complete catalogues of the materiel unearthed on these sites are still lacking. This article offers a<br />first overview of the pottery discovered at al-Qu??r by the French Mission in Kuwait in 1988–1989<br />and in 2007–2009 in two buildings identified as two churches (A1 and A2), two courtyard houses<br />(B1 and B8), and seven isolated buildings (B2–B7 and B9). The corpus was incomplete due to the<br />loss of sherds from 1988 and 1989 campaigns during the Gulf war and to the treatment of part<br />of the pottery discovered from 2007 to 2009. If quantification was meaningless and petrography<br />impossible, this corpus reflects the cultural proximity of the site with Mesopotamia and Persia<br />and diagnostic sherds such as pitchers with gouged lines or pointed circles with incised lines and<br />gouged motifs, stamped sherds, carinated turquoise-glazed cups, attest that the main occupation<br />of the site is related to an Early Islamic period. This dating is consistent with other Christian sites<br />in the region, contradicting both Arabic and Syriac sources that propounded the disappearance<br />of Christianity as soon as the beginnings of Islam.</p> Julie Bonnéric Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-11-07 2020-11-07 7 1 21 38 10.1558/jia.18272 Islamic Ceramics and Rural Economy in the Trapani Mountains during the 11th century https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/18273 <p>Located in the Trapani Mountains of North-West Sicily, the hilltop site of Pizzo Monaco has<br />formed the focus of systematic excavation and an innovative, integrated study of the total<br />ceramic assemblage, as part of the MEMOLA FP7 project. The date, provenance and production<br />technology of the varied types of pottery are investigated by macroscopic, morphological and<br />decorative analysis, in combination with petrography and scanning electron microscopy in order<br />to assess social, technological and economic ties of this rural site and its environs with the early<br />Islamic capital of Sicily at Palermo, the wider island and North Africa. Local production of cooking<br />vessels is compared with glazed and plain storage pottery, serving and consumption vessels<br />from Palermo, in a region where the new relationship between coastal centre and nearby mountain<br />economies was being forged. Correlation of the properties of the pottery assemblage with<br />the unusual architecture suggests the storage of a repeated ceramic set, perhaps on a household<br />basis, in a site which may be a fortified storage facility, rather than sustaining more permanent<br />occupation. The typological study provides new information on the range of ceramics circulating<br />in Sicily during the mid-11th century CE, revealing the full spectrum of ceramics consumed<br />at this time. This approach contrasts with work that privileges a view of simple transmission<br />of glazing technologies across the Islamic Mediterranean. Indeed a comparison of production<br />sequences in the crafting of similar glazed bowls at Palermo demonstrates the co-existence of<br />different communities of practice and cautions against over-simplified reconstructions of the<br />transmission of glazing technologies in the early medieval Mediterranean. The range of pottery<br />available from a variety of sources highlights the consumption choices made by these communities<br />in the medieval period.</p> Viva Sacco Veronica Testolini José Maria Martin Civantos Peter M. Day Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-11-07 2020-11-07 7 1 39 77 10.1558/jia.18273 The Mamluk Bridge at Dayr Sunayd https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/18274 <p>A long-overlooked Mamluk bridge spanning the W?d? al-Hasi (Na?al Shiqma) between Gaza and<br />Majdal (Ashqelon) was built at the behest of Sultan Baybars about 1270, as mentioned by ?Izz al-<br />D?n Ibn Shadd?d in his Ta?r?khal-M?lik al-??hir. It was also noted in a variety of travel accounts<br />spanning the 17th through 19th centuries and it was even photographed in the 1880s. Later it<br />became a point of interest during the Great War when it was shelled by the British Navy as part<br />of the Third Battle of Gaza, yet it survived to be repaired. Since it was on an important road even<br />in 1948, it was destroyed by a unit of Palmach in an attempt to impact infrastructure. The bridge<br />is one of the smallest of the six known Baybars bridges, yet it fully fits with the technological<br />characteristics of the other examples.</p> Jeffrey A. Blakely Dror Czitron Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-11-07 2020-11-07 7 1 79 92 10.1558/jia.18274 Small Statue, Big Conspiracy https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/18278 <p>In a large excavation, located in the proximity of the White Mosque, a residential building dated<br />to the Fatimid period was uncovered. The layout and the small finds of this spacious building attest to the wealth of its inhabitants. One special find was a shabti figurine found in a reception<br />room. The figurine is evidence of robbery and trade in funerary items from Ancient Egypt.</p> Hagit Torge Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-11-07 2020-11-07 7 1 93 99 10.1558/jia.18278 Les bains de Cefalà (Xe–XIXe siècle) : pratiques thermales d’origine islamique dans la Sicile médiévale / I bagni di Cefalà (secoli X–XIX) : pratiche termali d’origine islamica nella Sicilia medievale, by A. Bagnera and A. Nef (eds.) https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/18275 <p>Les bains de Cefalà (Xe–XIXe siècle) : pratiques thermales d’origine islamique dans la Sicile médiévale / I bagni di Cefalà (secoli X–XIX) : pratiche termali d’origine islamica nella Sicilia medievale, by A. Bagnera and A. Nef (eds.). Collection de l’École Française de Rome 538, Rome: École Française de Rome, 2018, 640pp., €90. ISBN-13: 9782728312504</p> Angelo Castrorao Barba Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-11-07 2020-11-07 7 1 101 103 10.1558/jia.18275 The Arts and Crafts of Syria and Egypt from the Ayyubids to World War I. Collected Essays, by Marcus Milwright https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/18276 <p>The Arts and Crafts of Syria and Egypt from the Ayyubids to World War I. Collected Essays, by Marcus Milwright. Piscataway, NJ: Gorgia Press, 2018, 379pp., $97.20. ISBN-13: 9781463239008</p> Valentina Vezzoli Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-11-07 2020-11-07 7 1 104 106 10.1558/jia.18276 Middle Islamic Jerash (9th Century-15th Century): Archaeology and History of an Ayyubid Mamluk settlement, by Achim Lichtenberger and Rubina Raja, (eds.) https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/18277 <p>Middle Islamic Jerash (9th Century-15th Century): Archaeology and History of an Ayyubid Mamluk settlement, by Achim Lichtenberger and Rubina Raja, (eds.). Jerash Papers 3, Turnhout: Brepols, 2018, 228 pp., €70. ISBN-13: 9782503578125.</p> Bethany J. Walker Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2020-11-07 2020-11-07 7 1 107 109 10.1558/jia.18277