https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/issue/feed Journal of Islamic Archaeology 2021-11-03T10:05:06+00:00 Bethany Walker bwalker@uni-bonn.de Open Journal Systems <p>The Journal of Islamic Archaeology is the only journal today devoted to the field of Islamic archaeology on a global scale. The term refers to the archaeological study of Islamic societies, polities, and communities, wherever they are found. It may be considered a type of “historical” archaeology, in which the study of historically (textually) known societies can be studied through a combination of “texts and tell”. <a href="https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/about">Read more</a>.</p> https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/21168 Dwelling Models of Umayyad Mada'in and Qusur in Greater Syria, by Giuseppe Labisi. 2021-11-03T09:07:41+00:00 Katarína Mokránová kat.mokranova@gmail.com <p>Dwelling Models of Umayyad Mada'in and Qusur in Greater Syria, by Giuseppe Labisi. BAR Publishing, 2020. 352pp., with 7 tables and 69 figures, Sc. £74.00. ISBN-13: 9781407357225.</p> 2021-11-02T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/21169 Early Islamic North Africa. A New Perspective, by Corisande Fenwick. 2021-11-03T09:07:38+00:00 Ann Liese Nef alnef@equinoxpub.com <p>Early Islamic North Africa. A New Perspective, by Corisande Fenwick. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2020. 202pp., $90. ISBN-13: 9781350075184.</p> 2021-11-02T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/21170 Broken Cities: A Historical Sociology of Ruins, by Martin Devecka. 2021-11-03T09:19:25+00:00 Andrew Petersen apetersen@equinoxpub.com <p>Broken Cities: A Historical Sociology of Ruins, by Martin Devecka. John Hopkins University Press, 2020. 184pp., $34.95. ISBN-13: 9781421438429.</p> 2021-11-02T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/21172 Mercaderes, artesanos y ulemas. Las ciudades de las Coras de Ilbira y Pechina en época Omeya, by Eneko López Martínez de Marigorta. 2021-11-03T09:07:35+00:00 Elena Salinas esalinas@ual.es <p>Mercaderes, artesanos y ulemas. Las ciudades de las Coras de Ilbira y Pechina en época Omeya, by Eneko López Martínez de Marigorta. Colección Arqueologías, Serie Medieval, 2020. 432pp., 23 maps, 32/39 figures. Pb. €50.00; eBook €17.00. ISBN-13: 9788491593560.</p> 2021-11-02T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/21173 Islamic Inscriptions in Ferghana and Zhetysu: Arabic-written monuments of the 11th–17th centuries from Kyrgyzstan (Russian), by Vladimir Nastich. 2021-11-03T09:07:31+00:00 Pierre Simeon pierresimeon@club-internet.fr <p>Islamic Inscriptions in Ferghana and Zhetysu: Arabic-written monuments of the 11th–17th centuries from Kyrgyzstan (Russian), by Vladimir Nastich. Publishing House of Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia, Saint Petersburg, 2019. 434pp. ISBN-13: 9785806426100.</p> 2021-11-02T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/18827 The Environment in the Islamic City of Termez (Uzbekistan) 2021-11-03T09:07:52+00:00 Rodrigo Portero rodrigoportero@usal.es Agnese Fusaro agnese.fusaro@gmail.com Raquel Piqué Raquel.Pique@uab.cat Josep M. Gurt jmgurt@ub.edu Mikelo Elorza concholis@yahoo.com Sónia Gabriel gabriel.sonia@gmail.com Shakir R. Pidaev shakirdjan@mail.ru <p>The aim of this paper is to understand the ways of life for the inhabitants of Termez (Uzbekistan) and its surrounding environment through the analysis of the zooarchaeological, charcoal, and ceramic material found inside a domestic combustion structure (tannur) dated to the early Islamic period (8th and 9th centuries AD). The tannur was located in a manufacturing area outside the city walls of old Termez, discovered during the 2018–2019 archaeological campaigns of the Uzbek-Spanish team IPAEB. The analysis of the charcoal hints at an abundance of local floral taxa that was used as firewood. The faunal remains indicate the presence of birds, mammals and fish at the site. The zooarchaeological study reveals the exploitation of the fluvial resources through the presence of fish of the Cyprinidae family in the vicinity of the Amu Darya. The scarcity of cut marks on and thermoalteration of the mammalian remains inside the tannur lead us to believe that the presence of the bones inside the container is related to their disposal rather than the use of the oven for cooking. Finally, the ceramic items collected in the tannur belong to the same wares and types identified in the assemblages collected from a workshop area at the site and are typical of the early Islamic period.</p> 2021-11-02T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/19909 The Different Fates of Architectures 2021-11-03T10:02:00+00:00 Nicolò Pini Nicolo.Pini@ulb.be <p>This paper aims to problematize the issue of reuse and reoccupation of architectures and building materials in the Near East. So far, the vast majority of research and published work dealing with this topic (not only in the field of Islamic Archaeology and Art History) have focused on the monumental complexes of urban centres. In this framework, the concept of spolia has been at the centre of a long and still heated transdisciplinary debate. Vernacular architecture and rural contexts have, for the most part, been neglected. Frequent episodes of reoccupation of earlier structures, even if thoroughly described in archaeological reports are almost automatically branded as the result of pragmatic behaviour of local communities benefitting from the availability of abundant building materials from ruined structures. However, the vast number of ways in which reuse and reoccupation might have occurred is often overlooked. Even conceding that most of the evidence is likely due to some form or other of “pragmatism,” the different ways in which these appear need to be more fully explained and interpreted. This paper, which builds on existing scholarship of reuse and reoccupation, argues for a rethinking of the methodology. Other experiences, most notably those investigating the late Antique and early Medieval western Mediterranean, provide a useful point of reference for where to start the discussion. This paper will demonstrate how extending the perspective from the single building to the broader context, including the surrounding landscape, is ultimately the only way to fully comprehend the archaeological evidence and possibly better understand and explain the different “fates” of architectures.</p> 2021-11-02T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/17852 New Insights from Middle Islamic Ceramics from Jerash 2021-11-03T10:05:06+00:00 Achim Lichtenberger lichtenb@uni-muenster.de Alex Peterson alex.h.peterson@gmail.com Silvia Polla silvia.polla@fu-berlin.de Rubina Raja rubina.raja@cas.au.dk Andreas Springer a.springer@schalley-lab.de Heiko Stukenbrok heiksta@online.de Carmen Ting ct589@cam.ac.uk <p>This article presents selected contextualized ceramic finds of the Middle Islamic period from the Northwest Quarter in Jerash, where a settlement of the same period has been investigated over the last years (2011–2016) within the framework of the Danish-German Jerash Northwest Quarter Project. Twenty-four sherds from various vessel types were selected for petrographic analysis, with 17 of these undergoing organic residue analysis as well. We bring together here the results of these analyses and present the sherds in their archaeological contexts together with the new information from the archaeo-scientific analyses. While on the basis of the results we cannot conclude much about specific vessels being assigned certain kinds of foods, we do present wide-ranging results of differing local and imported ceramics as well as a variety of animal and vegetal remains. The results bring to the forefront new knowledge about clay varieties and availability of different kinds of foodstuffs in Middle Islamic Jerash, a topic which is understudied.</p> 2021-11-02T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/19289 The Urban Bathhouse in the Islamic Far East 2021-11-03T09:55:37+00:00 Giles Dawkes giles.dawkes@ucl.ac.uk Martin Dow martin@dubh.net <p>While the bathhouses of Rome and Byzantium have received a great deal of academic attention in the West, the baths of the Islamic world, particularly those in the far Islamic East in Central Asia, have been largely overlooked and much scholarly research in this region has only been published in Russian. This paper is an attempt to readdress this regional bias by presenting an overview of medieval bathhouses in Kazakhstan, based largely on the results of a recent upsurge in commercial archaeological excavations in the country. Ten bathhouses are described, and the significant features of Kazakh baths are highlighted.</p> 2021-11-02T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/21166 Uncovering the Islamic Governmental Citadel of Shahdezh in Isfahan, Iran 2021-11-03T09:07:44+00:00 Hassan Karimian hkarimi@ut.ac.ir Abbasali Ahmadi a.ahmadi@lit.sku.ac.ir <p>The magnificent architectural complex known as Shahdezh Citadel is a defensive compound with an area of over 15 ha, sitting atop Soffeh Mountain, close to the city of Isfahan, Iran. It is a unique historical complex due to its majesty, impregnability, and strategic significance, however, studies on the Citadel are limited to a few historical documents and reports on its visible relics. It is for this reason that the present authors began archaeological investigations at this site in the summer of 2004. The main aim of the research was to determine the distribution and function of the architectural remains, as well as the construction and usage periods of the huge complex. To this end, topographic maps were prepared, followed by systematic surface survey and excavation of parts of the castle that were deemed most important. The findings of this research strongly suggest that the Shahdezh Castle was originally constructed in the Sassanid era (224–651 AD) and was later restored and reused by Saljuq rulers (1037–1194 AD) in the Islamic period. Its existence as a governmental citadel located near the Saljuq capital of Isfahan strengthens the authors’ proposition that Saljuq kings settled the royal family at the Shahdezh Citadel and ruled over the country from there.</p> 2021-11-02T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd.