https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/issue/feed Journal of Islamic Archaeology 2021-04-27T17:36:39+00:00 Bethany Walker bwalker@uni-bonn.de Open Journal Systems <p>The Journal of Islamic Archaeology is the only journal today devoted to the field of Islamic archaeology on a global scale. The term refers to the archaeological study of Islamic societies, polities, and communities, wherever they are found. It may be considered a type of “historical” archaeology, in which the study of historically (textually) known societies can be studied through a combination of “texts and tell”. <a href="https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/about">Read more</a>.</p> https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/19586 The Archaeology of Medieval Islamic Frontiers: From the Mediterranean to the Caspian Sea, edited by A. Asa Eger. 2021-03-10T09:49:34+00:00 Loren V. Cowin LCowin@roots.uni-kiel.de <p>The Archaeology of Medieval Islamic Frontiers: From the Mediterranean to the Caspian Sea, edited by A. Asa Eger. University of Colorado Press, 2019. 232pp., Hb. $58.00. ISBN-13: 9781607328780.</p> 2021-04-27T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/19587 The Aqaba Khans and the Origins of Khans in Jordan. An Archaeological Approach, by Reem Samed Al Shqour. 2021-03-10T09:53:03+00:00 Raffaele Ranieri ranieriraffa@gmail.com <p>The Aqaba Khans and the Origins of Khans in Jordan. An Archaeological Approach, by Reem Samed Al Shqour. Piscataway, NJ: Gorgias Press, 2019. 558 pp., $208.00 (hardback). ISBN-13: 9781463206512.</p> 2021-04-27T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/19588 Arqueología medieval en Guadalajara. Agua, paisaje y cultura material, edited by Guillermo García-Contreras Ruiz and Lauro Olmo Enciso. 2021-03-10T09:54:56+00:00 Carlos Tejerizo-García carlosteje@gmail.com <p>Arqueología medieval en Guadalajara. Agua, paisaje y cultura material, edited by Guillermo García-Contreras Ruiz and Lauro Olmo Enciso. Editorial Alhulia, 2018. 492pp., 133 figures, Hb. €24.04. ISBN-13: 9788494958885.</p> 2021-04-27T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/19589 Sacred Place and Sacred Time in the Medieval Islamic Middle East: A Historical Perspective, by Daniella Talmon-Heller. 2021-03-10T09:58:11+00:00 Hagit Nol nolgit@yahoo.com <p>Sacred Place and Sacred Time in the Medieval Islamic Middle East: A Historical Perspective, by Daniella Talmon-Heller. Edinburgh Studies in Classical Islamic History and Culture, Edinburgh University Press, 2020. 279pp., 28 illustrations, 1 additional map, index. Hb. £80. ISBN-13: 9781474460965.</p> 2021-04-27T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/19590 Ashkelon 8: The Islamic and Crusader Periods, by Tracy Hoffman. 2021-03-10T10:00:12+00:00 Hagit Nol nolgit@yahoo.com <p>Ashkelon 8: The Islamic and Crusader Periods, by Tracy Hoffman. Final Reports of the Leon Levy Expedition to Ashkelon 8. Eisenbrauns, 2019. 800 pp., 1110 color and 191 BW illusttrations, index. Hb. $149.95. ISBN-13: 9781575067353.</p> 2021-04-27T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/17679 Terraced Fields, Irrigation Systems and Agricultural Production in Early Islamic Palestine and Jordan 2020-06-02T10:46:09+00:00 Gideon Avni gideon@israntique.org.il <p>Contrary to previous analysis that suggested a rapid deterioration and abandonment of settlements and their related agricultural fields in Early Islamic Palestine and Jordan, recent studies point to a continuity of agricultural landscapes, to the introduction of new water management technologies, and to the diffusion of new types of crops into the region between the 8th and the 11th centuries. Forty years after Andrew Watson published his paradigmatic study on an “Islamic Agricultural Revolution,” this article, based on recent archaeological studies and new dating methodologies, suggests a modified view of “continuity in change” of agricultural practices in the Early Islamic period. Along the continuity in traditional agricultural strategies, the introduction of new plant species and water management technologies into the region gradually changed the economic basis of the local populations. The evaluation of several case-studies from the hinterland of Jerusalem, the Negev highlands, the ?Arabah Valley, and southern Jordan, show that together with the continuity of existing agricultural practices in the Mediterranean area and in the Negev Highlands, new irrigation technologies, cultivation methodologies and plant species were introduced to the Jordan and ?Arabah Valleys following the Arab conquest. This process affected the patterns of consumption and distribution of agricultural goods and triggered a change in dietary and dining habits.</p> 2021-04-27T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/17751 Islamic Tombstones Reused during the Early Islamic Period from Ramla, Capital of Jund Filastin 2020-05-19T08:38:00+00:00 Amir Gorzalczany amir@israntique.org.il Hagit Torgë torge@israntique.org.il <p>In different excavations in Ramla, fragmented Muslim tombstones were uncovered in secondary use, providing a terminus post quem in the mid or late 10th-century AD for their reuse. As showed by the ceramic evidence, the time elapsed between the last interments and the reusing of the tombstones stones as building material was at the most 70 years. Reusing of tombstones is a common archeological occurrence. In most cases, the reutilizing is carried out after a time enough to cut the emotional link between the burial and the builders, or when an ethnical replacement occurred, and new dwellers had no emotional relationship with the previous ones. The phenomenon in Ramla is then an exception. What were the circumstances that led to such an unusual comportment? One possible explanation is the occurrence of a traumatic event, such an earthquake. Following the dates on the stones, it is evident that the event could have occurred only after 961 AD. This could fit the tremor in 1033 AD, two generations after the erection of the tombstones. As for the lifespan of the reconstruction layers, the pottery assemblages related to them, show ceramic types diagnostic to the Fatimid period, not in use in the Crusader period. This, together with the simultaneous abandonment of sites in the city, suggest that the destruction of the reconstruction strata was caused by another catastrophic event, perhaps the 1068 AD tremor. If so, we have a hatch to a well-defined period, limited by two powerful natural catastrophes, that provide termini ante and post quem for the ephemeral reconstruction of the city.</p> 2021-04-27T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/13425 The Round Towers of the Andalusi-Catalan Borders (8th–10th centuries) 2020-06-03T18:38:03+00:00 Ramon Martí Ramon.Marti@uab.cat Mª Mercè Viladrich viladrich@ub.edu <p>This article reviews the subject of early medieval fortifications in Catalonia. In particular, we focus on the free-standing round towers, a type of construction that presents many variants. Academic disputes abound as to their origins; some of them are ascribed to the Roman period, whereas others are thought to belong to the time of the Catalan Counts (from the middle of the 10th century until the middle of the 12th century). These towers are common in wide areas of al-Andalus, where their Islamic origin is usually not disputed. Here, we explore the oldest samples found in the territories of Catalonia, by cross-checking archaeological and monumental data with textual sources, in order to test the hypothesis of an Andalusi origin of these very early constructions. This study covers a large geographical area, more than 300 km straight along the Catalan coastline and neighbouring territories. On this stretch of land there were as many as three different frontiers in the period under study between the lands under Christian or Islamic rule. We discuss up to 50 towers, each one built with the purpose of surveillance and control of the territory. This mission reflects a strategy of defence, which makes sense in the Islamic era if the enemy is coming from the north. Furthermore, the successive borders are linked to different styles of towers, which show the transformation from the 8th to the 10th centuries. We identify some of their builders among the Arab governors of the period. Initially relatively low buildings, these towers took on a notably monumental character in the days of Sulayman al-A'rabi. During the 9th century, the Carolingian intrusions sparked a rapid change, with the construction of much higher towers with battlements on the roofs, such as the ones that are predominant in the area around the city of Tortosa at the beginning of the 10th century.</p> 2021-04-27T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/19031 Thermoluminescence Analysis of Bricks from the so-called Arch of Ali Shah 2021-01-09T08:52:24+00:00 Amin Moradi Aminmoradi66@yahoo.com Marco Giovanni Brambilla mgbdomus@aol.com Fereshteh Pashaei Kamali Aminmoradi66@yahoo.com <p>The application of Thermally (TL) and Optically (OSL) Stimulated Luminescence on bricks used as building material can answer questions regarding the chronology of historical buildings. The remarkable historical reports of the “largest ever made brick vault” known as the Arch of Ali Shah (14th century) invoke the image of a gigantic structure adjoining the u-shaped brick monument in Tabriz. However, there is new scientific data that has led us to consider an alternate hypothesis regarding this monument that contradicts the traditional views of scholars. The attribution of this controversial building to Ali Shah, the great vizier of the Ilkhanid court, has long been considered an historical fact by scholars. To better understand the evolution of this unique structure, thermoluminescence (TL) was used to propose a relative dating for its construction. Surprisingly, the results yielded dates of 512±20, 514±27 and 517±21 AD (TL age, equaling 17th century), indicating that the u-shaped structure was built some 200 years after the Ilkhanid era. These dates, supplemented with historical context and architectural evidence, leads to the conclusion that it was used as a separate building before being integrated into the older building, thereby converting the entire complex into a formidable fortification. The remains of the so called Arch of Ali Shah are clearly of a later date, characterizing a completely different architectural style than those of the Ilkhanid period.</p> 2021-04-27T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JIA/article/view/18167 Pre-oil Globalization in a Rural Community 2020-10-15T18:30:47+00:00 Irini Biezeveld biezeveld@em.uni-frankfurt.de Bleda S. Düring b.s.during@arch.leidenuniv.nl <p class="Alinea1">This article aims to study whether the increase of agricultural settlements in the Sultanate of Oman during the Late Islamic period (c. 1500-1950) was related to pre-oil globalization, as attested in the wider Gulf region. This is done by analysing the archaeological dataset of the agricultural village of Sahlat, with a focus on the ceramic material, located in the Suhar region. The assemblages collected by the Wadi al-Jizzi Archaeological Project, point to its occupation from c. 1750 to 1930. During this time period, the coastal towns of southeastern Arabia were heavily influenced by globalization processes, but the effects and reach of trade on rural communities remains poorly known. In this paper, Sahlat is compared to two contemporary sites connected to the same falaj system, and two other sites in the Gulf region. The results indicate that pre-oil globalization did not only impact coastal towns, but that rural settlements such as Sahlat experienced similar transformations. It is suggested that pre-oil globalization was not only linked to the pearling trade, but that the export of dates should also be taken into consideration when studying this topic.</p> 2021-04-27T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Equinox Publishing Ltd.