What Is the Relationship of Spencerian, Durkheimian and Marxian Natural Selections to Darwinian Natural Selection and How Can We Formalize Their Mutual Interaction?

Authors

  • Radek Kundt LEVYNA Laboratory for the Experimental Research of Religion, Masaryk University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/jcsr.35728

Keywords:

natural selection, replicator, group selection, superorganism, Price

Abstract

What Is the Relationship of Spencerian, Durkheimian and Marxian Natural Selections to Darwinian Natural Selection and How Can We Formalize Their Mutual Interaction?

Author Biography

Radek Kundt, LEVYNA Laboratory for the Experimental Research of Religion, Masaryk University

LEVYNA Laboratory for the Experimental Research of Religion, Masaryk University

References

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———. 2016b. “Reasons to Be Fussy about Cultural Evolution.” Biology and Philosophy 31(3): 447–458. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10539-016-9516-4

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———. 1972. “Extension of Covariance Selection Mathematics.” Annals of Human Genetics 35(4): 485–490. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-1809.1957.tb01874.x

Scott-Phillips, T. C. 2017. “A (Simple) Experimental Demonstration that Cultural Evolution Is Not Replicative, but Reconstructive: And an Explanation of Why This Difference Matters.” Journal of Cognition and Culture 17(1–2): 1–11. https://doi.org/10.1163/15685373-12342188

Sperber, D. 2000. “An Objection to the Memetic Approach to Culture. In Darwinizing Culture: The Status of Memetics as a Science, edited by R. Aunger, 163–173. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

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Williams, G. C. 1992. Natural Selection: Domains, Levels, and Challenges. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Published

2018-05-15

How to Cite

Kundt, R. (2018). What Is the Relationship of Spencerian, Durkheimian and Marxian Natural Selections to Darwinian Natural Selection and How Can We Formalize Their Mutual Interaction?. Journal for the Cognitive Science of Religion, 4(1), 67–71. https://doi.org/10.1558/jcsr.35728