https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JASR/issue/feed Journal for the Academic Study of Religion 2022-12-06T00:24:25+00:00 Bernard Doherty bdoherty@csu.edu.au Open Journal Systems <p>The <em>Journal for the Academic Study of Religion </em>is a fully refereed and interdisciplinary academic journal. The journal reflects the wide variety of research dealing with all aspects of the academic study of religion, but the journal does not publish purely confessional articles.</p> https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JASR/article/view/22144 Bettina E. Schmidt and Jeff Leonardi (eds), Spirituality and Wellbeing: Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Religious Experience and Health 2022-01-31T21:44:21+00:00 Anna Lutkajtis anna.lutkajtis@gmail.com <p>Bettina E. Schmidt and Jeff Leonardi (eds), Spirituality and Wellbeing: Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Religious Experience and Health, Sheffield, UK and Bristol, CT: Equinox, 2020, pp. vii + 248, ISBN: 9-781781-797655 (pbk). £26.95.</p> 2022-03-24T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JASR/article/view/22375 Adam Yuet Chau, Religion in China: Ties that Bind 2022-02-21T02:09:56+00:00 Philip L Wickeri pwickeri@mac.com Ruiwen Chen chenruiwen2006@icloud.com <p>Adam Yuet Chau, Religion in China: Ties that Bind. Cambridge and Medford, MA: Polity, 2019, pp. 200, ISBN: 9780745679150 (pbk). $23.95.</p> 2022-05-12T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JASR/article/view/22327 Andrew Singleton, Anna Halafoff, Mary Lou Rasmussen and Gary Bouma, Freedoms, Faiths and Futures: Teenage Australians on Religion, Sexuality and Diversity 2022-02-15T05:16:04+00:00 Andrew P Lynch aplynch002@gmail.com <p>Andrew Singleton, Anna Halafoff, Mary Lou Rasmussen and Gary Bouma, Freedoms, Faiths and Futures: Teenage Australians on Religion, Sexuality and Diversity. London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2021, pp. 235, ISBN: 978-1-350-17956-1 (hbk). $170.00.</p> 2022-05-12T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JASR/article/view/22964 David Newheiser, Hope in a Secular Age: Deconstruction, Negative Theology, and the Future of Faith 2022-04-27T06:40:13+00:00 Petra Brown petra.b@deakin.edu.au <p>David Newheiser, Hope in a Secular Age: Deconstruction, Negative Theology, and the Future of Faith, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019, pp. 177, ISBN: 9781108498661 (hbk). $156.95 AUD.</p> 2022-07-13T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JASR/article/view/23030 David J. Shepherd (ed.), The Silents of Jesus in the Cinema (1897–1927) 2022-05-03T21:59:40+00:00 Anton Karl Kozlovic akozlovi@deakin.edu.au <p>David J. Shepherd (ed.), The Silents of Jesus in the Cinema (1897–1927). London: Routledge, 2019, pp. xii + 292, ISBN: 978-0-367-86944-1 (pbk). $77.99.</p> 2022-07-13T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JASR/article/view/22882 Andrew R. Polk, Faith in Freedom: Propaganda, Presidential Politics and the Making of an American Religion 2022-04-19T00:14:39+00:00 Manas Pandey manas.pandey@live.vu.edu.au <p>Andrew R. Polk, Faith in Freedom: Propaganda, Presidential Politics and the Making of an American Religion. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2021, pp. 230, ISBN: 9781501759222 (hbk). $63.69 AUD.</p> 2022-07-13T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JASR/article/view/23265 David Rankin, Film and the Afterlife 2022-05-30T04:09:47+00:00 Anton Karl Kozlovic akozlovi@deakin.edu.au <p>David Rankin, Film and the Afterlife. London: Routledge, 2020, pp. viii + 193, ISBN: 978-0-367-78548-2 (pbk). £36.99.</p> 2022-09-20T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JASR/article/view/22397 Religiosity and Entrepreneurship in Post-Soviet Russia 2022-02-23T14:36:11+00:00 Edgar Demetrio Tovar-García dtovar@up.edu.mx <p>This article empirically studies the associations between religion (Orthodox Christianity, Islam, and non-religion), religiosity (to be a believer or not, and to what extent), religious participation (attending divine services, meetings or other religious events) and the probabilities of being an entrepreneur in post-Soviet Russia. Using logistic regressions and data from the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey, the findings suggest lower likelihoods of being an entrepreneur in the case of Orthodox Christians, religiosity shows mixed results, and religious participation presents positive links (increasing the probabilities of becoming an entrepreneur). Nevertheless, the negative association between Orthodoxy and entrepreneurship lacks statistical significance in several specifications. Indeed, only religious participation shows robust results, particularly for men. Note that religious participation is linked to social capital, namely, networking, facilitating resources for entrepreneurship. Therefore, in Russia, the religion-entrepreneurship nexus is associated with participation, and not precisely with religious affiliations or beliefs.</p> 2022-09-22T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JASR/article/view/19964 ‘It Makes a Difference in My Life’ 2021-04-17T21:12:15+00:00 Eric D Rackley eric.rackley@byuh.edu <p>Informed by social theories of literacy, religious literacy, and motivation for literacy, this article examines the motivations for religious literacy embedded in the lived experiences of 16 Latter-day Saint young adults. Several cycles of qualitative analysis of semi-structured and verbal protocol interviews with Latter-day Saint college students point to three primary motivations for reading sacred texts: reading to improve one’s self, reading to learn information about one’s faith, and reading to receive guidance. These religiosocial motivations grew out of participants’ everyday religious, personal and educational experiences with sacred texts and provide empirical support for the religiosocial influence of sacred texts in young adults’ lives. Findings have implications for religious researchers and educators working at the intersection of religion, literacy and motivation.</p> 2022-09-22T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JASR/article/view/20265 Spiritual Practice and the Art of Ecological Living 2021-06-04T04:36:00+00:00 Deborah Guess deborahguess@bigpond.com <p>Arguably, responses to the ecological crisis need to go further than renewable technology and emissions policy to embrace deeper and wider changes in ideas, attitudes and behaviour and more broadly cultivate an art of ecological living. This article discusses two sets of spiritual practice that contain within them seeds that implicitly cohere with an ecological ethos and therefore might be conducive to cultivating an ecologically sensitive way of living. These are the spiritual exercises of Greek and Roman philosophical schools, especially as understood by Pierre Hadot, and the contemporary practice of Christian meditation. This article discusses three aspects that, despite acknowledged differences, are common to both the ancient spiritual exercises and contemporary Christian meditation: the way they aim to transform the whole of the practitioner’s life, resonating with ecology’s broad and holistic scope; the <br />centrality of paying attention, enabling the practitioner to be grounded in the present time and place which in turn facilitates greater awareness of what is other to us; and the advocacy of an ethic of self-restraint, countering the ideology and practice of constant growth and consumerism.</p> 2022-09-22T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/JASR/article/view/19233 Everyday Religion and the Complexity of Islamic Space 2021-02-02T23:58:07+00:00 Samuel Blanch sam.blanch@newcastle.edu.au <p>The turn to ‘everyday religion’ has disrupted the so-called ‘Muslim problem’, suggesting modes of multiculturalism located not in abstract principles of citizenship but grounded in the concrete practices of local communities. In this article, however, I offer two critiques of the literature on everyday religion in Australia. First, the literature has limited itself to discursive methodologies, largely ignoring material aspects of the everyday. Second, I show how studies of everyday religion assume multiculturalism’s location in a given public space. Drawing on ethnography from the Shia Muslim community of Sydney, I show how Shia practices of visual pilgrimage leverage an understanding of complex space that transforms everyday experience. I argue that allowing for diversity requires not merely an attentiveness to different discourses in the public sphere; it requires an allowance for difference at a deeper level, where everyday religion can generate complex alternative experiences of space itself.</p> 2022-12-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd.