Implicit Religion

Definition and Application

Authors

  • Karen Lord University of Wales,

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/imre2006.v9i2.205

Keywords:

implicit religion, folk religion, civil religion, wild religion, invisible religion, secular quest for meaning

Abstract

This article provides a foundational definition of implicit religion, using the characteristics identified by the research of Edward Bailey, and examines the applicability of this construct as a research tool in the analysis of religious behaviour. Types of implicit religion and their relationship to concepts such as civil religion, folk religion, invisible religion and wild religion are discussed, demonstrating that the boundaries of religion are not objectively defined. The paper concludes by recommending the construct of implicit religion as a tool to gain a new perspective on the study of religious behaviour.

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Published

2007-12-03

How to Cite

Lord, K. (2007). Implicit Religion: Definition and Application . Implicit Religion, 9(2), 205–219. https://doi.org/10.1558/imre2006.v9i2.205

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Section

Articles