On Why Gaita Doesn’t Describe Eichmann as Sacred

Authors

  • Alexander Segal Charles Sturt University
  • Morgan Luck Charles Sturt University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/imre.v17i2.197

Keywords:

Gaita, Eichmann, sacred, religious

Abstract

In this article we examine a potential problem for Raimond Gaita (born 1946). It arises from the way that Gaita, in Good and Evil: An Absolute Conception, affirms the value of describing Eichmann as sacred, yet says that he, as a non-religious person, is unable to describe Eichmann as sacred. We argue that the tension in Gaita’s position does not in reality amount to a contradiction, and so we defuse the potential problem.

References

Chesterton, G. K. 1990. The Collected Works. Volume 3. San Francisco, CA: Ignatius Press.

Gaita, Raimond. 2002. The Philosopher’s Dog. Melbourne: Text Publishing.

———. 2004. Good and Evil : An Absolute Conception. 2nd edition. New York: Routledge.

Holland, R. F. 1980. Against Empiricism. Totowa: Barnes and Noble.

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Published

2014-08-12

How to Cite

Segal, A., & Luck, M. (2014). On Why Gaita Doesn’t Describe Eichmann as Sacred. Implicit Religion, 17(2), 197–210. https://doi.org/10.1558/imre.v17i2.197

Section

Articles