We Are the Walking Dead

Robert Kirkman’s Zombies and Buddhist Body Image

Authors

  • Peter Herman Georgetown University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/imre.v17i4.433

Keywords:

Buddhism, Comic Books, Zombies, Theology, Body Image.

Abstract

Robert Kirkman’s popular horror comic The Walking Dead offers the basis for a constructive Buddhist reading of the identification of the body with the authentic self. By applying both traditional Buddhist readings of charnel ground meditations and theorist Julia Kristeva’s understanding of “abjection,” this article argues that the comic can be read in a socially progressive mode, destabilizing the identification of authentic personhood with specific and particular bodies.

References

Buddhaghosa, Bhadantacariya. 1976. The Path of Purification (Visuddhimagga). Translated by Bhikku Ñyanamoli. San Francisco, CA: Shambhala.

Gethin, Rupert. 2008. Sayings of the Buddha: New Translations from the Pali Nikayas. New York: Oxford University Press.

Kirkman, Robert. 2008. “Letter Hacks.” The Walking Dead 54: 27.

Kristeva, Julia. 1982. Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection. Translated by Leon S. Roudiez. New York: Columbia University Press.

Published

2014-12-12

How to Cite

Herman, P. (2014). We Are the Walking Dead: Robert Kirkman’s Zombies and Buddhist Body Image. Implicit Religion, 17(4), 433–442. https://doi.org/10.1558/imre.v17i4.433

Issue

Section

Articles