The Speed of Belief

Religion and Science Fiction, an Introduction to the Implicit Religions of Science Fiction

Authors

  • Kimberly Rae Connor University of San Francisco

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/imre.v17i4.367

Keywords:

belief, imagination, literature, poetry, religion, science fiction, supernatural

Abstract

This article considers the relationship between religion and literature as refracted through the genre of science fiction writing. Connor explores the possibilities for religions created in the hyphen between “science” and “fiction.” Religion and science fiction each offers a conception of reality that inclines toward different explanations not just of human behavior but of divine (supernatural) behavior and each suggests differing ideas about how to respond. Using poetry as an additional literary from for understanding the relationship between religion and science fiction literature, Connor explores some of the spaces for the invention and expression of religion in its implicit forms.

References

Bellah, Robert. 2011. Religion in Human Evolution: From the Paleolithic to the Axial Age. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. http://dx.doi.org/10.4159/harvard.9780674063099

The Book of Mormon. 2011. Program Book. New York: Arca Group.

Dozias, Gardner, ed. 1998. The Good Old Stuff: Adventure SF in the Grand Tradition. New York: St. Martin’s Griffin.

Smith, Tracy K. 2011. Life on Mars. Minneapolis, MN: Greywolf Press.

Published

2014-12-12

How to Cite

Connor, K. R. (2014). The Speed of Belief: Religion and Science Fiction, an Introduction to the Implicit Religions of Science Fiction. Implicit Religion, 17(4), 367–377. https://doi.org/10.1558/imre.v17i4.367

Issue

Section

Articles