The Theory of the Earth Energy

Academia and the Vernacular in Search of the Supernatural

Authors

  • Kristel Kivari University of Tartu, Department of Estonian and Comparative Folklore

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/imre.v18i3.18580

Keywords:

Baltic Countries, Dowsing, Folklore, History of Geology, Place-legends

Abstract

Using the concept of “implicit religion,” this article attempts to show how the broad field of vernacular ideas and practices, related to the “forces beyond,” provide an explanation for living in general. The idea that reality is shaped by an imperceptible “force” or “radiation,” which has an impact on human health and cognition, is the background for curiosity about dowsing practices. The discussions of early miners in Germany show the accommodation of vernacular practice within the framework of natural science and technology during the early modern period. A similar approach was also present at the end of the 1980s when the Baltic Dowsers’ Association formulated its activities, as seen in the collections of articles generated by their periodical conferences. The article concludes with an analysis of the formulation of vernacular truth about Earth energies alongside the material sciences, and presents the usage of such place legends and vernacular practices in the fringes of Academia.

References

Sources

Fieldwork material

FM 1 Interview with male informant on 24-09-2011.

FM 2 Interview with male informant on 6-01-2012.

Collections of articles

Tallinn: The Earth’s Fields and Their Influence on Organisms. International Symposium. Pärnu, Aug. 26-29, 1991. Excursion Guide and Abstracts. Tallinn: Academy of Sciences Institute of Geology.

Vilnius: The Earth’s Fields and Their Influence on Organisms. Abstracts. International Seminar at Vilnius. May 31–June 2, 1994. Vilnius: Institute of Mathematics and Information.

Tallinn: The Earth’s Fields and Their Influence on Organisms. International Symposium July 04-07, 1996, Excursion Guide and Abstracts. Tallinn: Institute of Geology, Baltic Dowsers’ Association.

Tallinn: The Earth’s Fields and Their Influence on Organisms. International Seminar at Rõuge June 26-30, 2000. Tallinn: Institute of Geology, Baltic Dowsers’ Association, Estonian Psychotronics Society.

Kloogarand: The Earth’s Fields and Their Influence on Organisms. Abstracts. Tallinn: Institute of Geology, Geopathic Society, Baltic Dowsers’ Association.

References

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Published

2015-09-21

How to Cite

Kivari, K. (2015). The Theory of the Earth Energy: Academia and the Vernacular in Search of the Supernatural. Implicit Religion, 18(3), 399–421. https://doi.org/10.1558/imre.v18i3.18580

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Section

Articles