What American College Students Want from Religion

Facebookismanity, Lucid Dreaming, and Bodhisattva Tupac Shakur

Authors

  • Kevin Matthew Taylor Independent Scholar

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/imre.v19i2.28563

Keywords:

college student religion, religion and the life course, religious tolerance, religious autonomy, happiness

Abstract

In 2007, 10 groups of college students in an introductory-level religion course were asked to create a new religion that would appeal to their peers. This article analyzes the content of those religions, as well as student reflections on them, in light of quantitative studies and original analysis of a sample of college students drawn from Wave 3 of the National Study of Youth and Religion. It finds that college students see themselves and their cohort as interested primarily in religions that revolve around three axes: tolerance and inclusivity, moral and intellectual autonomy, and this-worldly happiness. These findings suggest that a synthesis of literature on the life course and on American moral culture provides the best analytical framework for viewing American college student approaches to religion and spirituality.

Author Biography

Kevin Matthew Taylor, Independent Scholar

PhD from Boston University, Graduated 2015, Research interests in American religion, religious diversity, Christianity, moral communities, religion and family, religion and education

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Published

2016-11-15

How to Cite

Taylor, K. M. (2016). What American College Students Want from Religion: Facebookismanity, Lucid Dreaming, and Bodhisattva Tupac Shakur. Implicit Religion, 19(2), 237–265. https://doi.org/10.1558/imre.v19i2.28563

Section

Articles