https://journal.equinoxpub.com/IJSNR/issue/feed International Journal for the Study of New Religions 2020-11-25T13:29:16+00:00 Fredrik Gregorius and Venetia Robertson ijsnreditors@equinoxpub.com Open Journal Systems <p>The term “New Religions” can be defined in several ways. The journal -- and its affiliated association, the International Association for the Study of New Religions,<em> --</em> have chosen to adopt a broad definition and welcome material reflecting a broad range of disciplines and approaches. <a href="https://journal.equinoxpub.com/IJSNR/about">Read more about the journal.</a></p> https://journal.equinoxpub.com/IJSNR/article/view/18747 Editors’ Introduction 2020-11-23T13:46:49+00:00 Venetia Robertson vrob4442@uni.sydney.edu.au Fredrik Gregorius fredrik.gregorius@liu.se 2020-11-25T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/IJSNR/article/view/18752 Digital Jesus: The Making of a New Christian Fundamentalist Community on the Internet, by Robert Glenn Howard. 2020-11-23T14:41:49+00:00 David W. McConeghy david.mcconeghy@gmail.com <p>Digital Jesus: The Making of a New Christian Fundamentalist Community on the Internet, by Robert Glenn Howard. New York University Press, 2011. 213pp., pb., $27.00. ISBN-13: 9780814773109.</p> 2020-11-25T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/IJSNR/article/view/18753 Everyday Mysticism: A Contemplative Community at Work in the Desert, by Ariel Gluckich. 2020-11-23T14:47:52+00:00 Jeremy Rapport JRapport@wooster.edu <p>Everyday Mysticism: A Contemplative Community at Work in the Desert, by Ariel Gluckich. Yale University Press, 2017. 280pp., Hb. $45.00, ISBN-13: 9780300212099.</p> 2020-11-25T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/IJSNR/article/view/18754 The Seer of Bayside: Veronica Lueken and the Struggle to Define Catholicism, by Joseph P. Laycock. 2020-11-23T14:58:15+00:00 Grant Shoffstall gs8@williams.edu <p>The Seer of Bayside: Veronica Lueken and the Struggle to Define Catholicism, by Joseph P. Laycock. Oxford University Press, 2015. 284pp., Hb $33.95, ISBN-13: 9780199379668.</p> 2020-11-25T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/IJSNR/article/view/18755 Everyday Sacred: Religion in Contemporary Quebec, edited by Hillary Kaell. 2020-11-23T15:05:28+00:00 Susan J. Palmer susan.palmer@mcgill.ca <p>Everyday Sacred: Religion in Contemporary Quebec, edited by Hillary Kaell. McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2017. 368pp., Pb. CDN$32.95, ISBN-13: 9780773550957.</p> 2020-11-25T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/IJSNR/article/view/18756 Among the Scientologists: History, Theology, and Praxis, by Donald A. Westbrook. 2020-11-23T15:31:32+00:00 Fredrik Gregorius fredrik.gregorius@liu.se <p>Among the Scientologists: History, Theology, and Praxis, by Donald A. Westbrook. Oxford University Press, 2019. 332pp. Hb $45.00/£29.99. ISBN-13: 9780190664978.</p> 2020-11-25T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/IJSNR/article/view/18757 Dynamism and the Ageing of a Japanese “New” Religion: Transformations and the Founder, by Erica Baffelli and Ian Reader. 2018. 2020-11-23T15:43:00+00:00 Ernils Larsson ernils_l@hotmail.com <p>Dynamism and the Ageing of a Japanese “New” Religion: Transformations and the Founder, by Erica Baffelli and Ian Reader. 2018. Bloomsbury Academic. Hb. £91.80/$114.00, ISBN-13: 9781350086517; Pb. £28.99/€39.95, ISBN-13: 9781350170148; eBook £91.80/$114.00, ISBN-13: 9781350086531.</p> 2020-11-25T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/IJSNR/article/view/18748 Engaging with the Church of Scientology and the Free Zone in the Field 2020-11-23T13:55:31+00:00 Aled J. Ll. Thomas aled.thomas@open.ac.uk <p>An increasing number of scholars are turning their attention towards the study of Scientology, the New Religious Movement founded by L. Ron Hubbard. Such studies tend to focus on the institutionalized Church of Scientology (CoS). However, of increasing importance to the study of Scientology is the rise of the Free Zone—a category for groups of individuals who identify as Scientologists but practise outside the CoS. The CoS and Free Zone have experienced a turbulent history. Both groups often view one another with suspicion, raising debates concerning legitimacy and Scientological heresy. Successfully navigating between both the CoS and Free Zone in the field requires a careful approach on behalf of the scholar. Furthermore, working with both the CoS and Free Zone individually also presents specific challenges, particularly in terms of gaining the trust of fieldwork participants. This article draws from the author’s fieldwork with both the CoS and the Free Zone as a case study of the challenges faced when conducting fieldwork with minority groups in direct opposition to one another, and explores ethnographic issues that have arisen in the contemporary study of Scientology.</p> 2020-11-25T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/IJSNR/article/view/18749 The Process Church of the Final Judgment 2020-11-23T14:09:10+00:00 Carole M. Cusack carole.cusack@sydney.edu.au <p>This article examines a new religious movement (NRM) founded by charismatic leaders in the mid-1960s from the viewpoint of its demise. The Process Church of the Final Judgment was founded in 1966 in London by Mary Ann MacLean and Robert de Grimston. The Process developed a theology melding esoteric Biblical motifs with psychoanalysis. The Process ceased to exist two decades later due to changes in belief and affiliation; members adopted other, mainstream, identities. De Grimston was expelled from The Process in 1974, after which it transformed into The Foundation Faith of God under MacLean’s leadership. The Foundation Faith of God later morphed into the Best Friends Animal Society in Kanab, Utah, abandoning a religious identity in favour of an animal rights-based identity. Until recently little attention was paid to how NRMs ended; the academic focus was overwhelmingly on the origins of such groups. This study builds on new research to argue that The Process ended via activities of transmutation and replacement. In 2020 The Process is a defunct religion with extensive online archives, curated by exmembers and enthusiasts. Processean ideas are kept “alive” and potentially able to be revived; the status of virtual communities and attempted revivals is also discussed with regard to identifying the precise date of the demise of NRMs.</p> 2020-11-25T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/IJSNR/article/view/18750 Promises of Purity 2020-11-23T14:18:30+00:00 Emily J Bailey ebailey@towson.edu <p>At the turn of the nineteenth century “purity” movements, like those practiced at the Seventh-day Adventist Battle Creek Sanitarium, were an outlet for individuals striving to reconcile their health with heterodox religious views about the Second Coming of Christ. This article examines the letters and writings of professed prophet Ellen G. White and Adventist promotional materials for the Battle Creek Sanitarium as they relate to broader health reforms at the time. In pamphlets, catalogues, and menus, the Sanitarium promised patients/patrons the latest medical advances to help restore their bodies, while White also hoped to save their souls. According to White, sanctification was possible through austerities in diet and health reform, making “the San” and its offshoots religiously significant players in the spiritual and health marketplaces of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.</p> 2020-11-25T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/IJSNR/article/view/18751 Jehovah’s Witnesses 2020-11-23T14:26:08+00:00 George Chryssides GDChryssides@blueyonder.co.uk <p>Major publications on Jehovah’s Witnesses with scholarly or historical merit are reviewed here. Early writings, and literature relating to the two World Wars are discussed, followed by important “insider” accounts of the organization, notably A. H. Macmillan, Marley Cole, and Timothy White, and ex-member publications by M. James Penton, Raymond Franz, and Carl Jonsson. Particular attention is given to books appearing after 2014, notably Emily Baran, Zoe Knox, and the substantial three-volume anthology by Gerhard Besier and Katarzyna Stok?osa. The review does not cover novels, countercult critiques, or the author’s own publications.</p> 2020-11-25T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd.