ORGAN DONATION

IS A CHANGE TO LEGISLATION IS THE ANSWER?

Authors

  • Lynne Thomson Western Infirmary, Glasgow

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/hscc.v4i1.7

Keywords:

legislation, opt-in, opt-out, organ donation, organ supply, transplantation

Abstract

In 2000 the number of organ transplants performed fell by 3% while the waiting list numbers rose by 2%. The human consequence of these statistics is that because of the shortage of organs more people who are in need of a transplant are dying. There is no one single reason to why this is happening with the result that the solution may be complex. One initiative to improve the current situation with regards organ donation is a change to legislation, to move from the current system where-by the views of the next of kin are sought prior to donation, to one where consent will be presumed unless the deceased has registered an objection during their lifetime.

Author Biography

Lynne Thomson, Western Infirmary, Glasgow

Lynne Thomson is Transplant Co ordinator at the Western Infirmary, Glasgow.

References

KING'S FUND INSTITUTE 1994, A Question of Give and Take. Improving the Supply of Donor Organs for Transplantation. London: Kings Fund Institute

BRITISH MEDICAL ASSOCIATION. 2000, Organ Donation in the 21st Century. Time for a Consolidated Approach. British Medical Association

WORKING PARTY (1995) Report of the British Transplantation Society Working Party on Organ Donation

THE HERALD (2000) Doctors back bid for law reform, MACDERMID ALAN, The Herald, April 11th 2000

Published

2013-06-04

How to Cite

Thomson, L. (2013). ORGAN DONATION: IS A CHANGE TO LEGISLATION IS THE ANSWER?. Health and Social Care Chaplaincy, 7-9. https://doi.org/10.1558/hscc.v4i1.7