Editors’ Introduction

Contextualizing Homes and Fields in the Ethnography of India

Authors

  • Amy L. Allocco Elon University
  • Jennifer D. Ortegren Middlebury College

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1558/firn.18348

Keywords:

Editorial

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Author Biographies

Amy L. Allocco , Elon University

Amy L. Allocco is an ethnographer whose research focuses on vernacular Hinduism, especially contemporary ritual traditions and women’s religious practices in the South Indian state of Tamil Nadu, where she has been studying and conducting fieldwork for 25 years. She has published on snake goddess traditions, the narrative strategies of a female Hindu healer, and ritual innovation. Allocco’s current project, “Domesticating the Dead: Invitation and Installation Rituals in Tamil South India”, delineates the repertoire of ritual relationships that Hindus maintain with their dead kin and analyzes the ceremonies to honor deceased relatives called pūvāt˙ aikkāri (“the woman wearing flowers”).

Jennifer D. Ortegren, Middlebury College

Jennifer D. Ortegren is an ethnographer of South Asian religions whose work focuses on the intersections of religion and class among upwardly mobile women, and their families, in Udaipur, Rajasthan. She has published on the everyday and ritual lives of emerging middleclass Hindu women and is currently developing a project among Muslim women, including how class mobility impacts relationships between neighbors from diverse religious backgrounds and the role of women in mediating these relationships.

References

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Published

2020-11-05

How to Cite

Allocco , A. L. ., & Ortegren, J. D. (2020). Editors’ Introduction: Contextualizing Homes and Fields in the Ethnography of India. Fieldwork in Religion, 15(1-2), 7–17. https://doi.org/10.1558/firn.18348