Buddhist Studies Review https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR <p><em>Buddhist Studies Review</em>&nbsp;is published by Equinox on behalf of the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ukabs.org.uk/ukabs/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">UK Association for Buddhist Studies</a>. The Association was founded in 1996 and two years later took over publication of&nbsp;<em>Buddhist Studies Review</em>, which had been run since 1983 by Russell Webb and Sara Boin-Webb. Membership in the Association includes a subscription to the journal among other benefits.You can join the Association through the membership pages on their website.&nbsp;</p> en-US b.peter.harvey@gmail.com (Peter Harvey and Alice Collett) aparkin@equinoxpub.com (Ailsa Parkin) Thu, 19 Mar 2020 00:00:00 +0000 OJS 3.2.0.3 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Editorial https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17526 Peter Harvey Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17526 Thu, 19 Mar 2020 00:00:00 +0000 The Structure and Formation of the A?guttara Nik?ya and the Ekottarika ?gama https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17527 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In both the&nbsp;</span><em style="font-weight: 400;">A?guttara Nik?ya</em><span style="font-weight: 400;">&nbsp;in Pali and the&nbsp;</span><em style="font-weight: 400;">Ekottarika ?gama</em><span style="font-weight: 400;">in Chinese translation, the suttas are grouped into eleven nip?tas (“books”), from the&nbsp;</span><em style="font-weight: 400;">Ekaka-nip?ta/Eka-nip?ta</em><span style="font-weight: 400;">&nbsp;(Book of Ones) to the&nbsp;</span><em style="font-weight: 400;">Ek?dasaka-nip?ta</em><span style="font-weight: 400;">&nbsp;(Book of Elevens) – though in the&nbsp;</span><em style="font-weight: 400;">Ekottarika ?gama</em><span style="font-weight: 400;">&nbsp;the nip?tas are not labelled as such. This grouping into nip?tas is based on the number of doctrinal items dealt with in the component suttas. In the Ones and Twos, it is often the case that a single original sutta has been subdivided so that its component sections become a series of similarly structured derivative suttas superficially appropriate for inclusion in the Ones or Twos. Moreover, material for this process of subdividing has sometimes been provided by multiplying doctrinal sets with formulaic statements. In most of the remaining nip?tas the phenomena noted in the Ones and Twos are also present, but on a much smaller scale. In view of their Chinese counterparts in the&nbsp;</span><em style="font-weight: 400;">Sa?yukta ?gama</em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, some groups of suttas in the&nbsp;</span><em style="font-weight: 400;">A?guttara Nik?ya</em><span style="font-weight: 400;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">with sa?yutta-like nature were probably moved from the&nbsp;</span><em style="font-weight: 400;">Sa?yutta Nik?ya</em><span style="font-weight: 400;">&nbsp;to the&nbsp;</span><em style="font-weight: 400;">A?guttara Nik?ya</em><span style="font-weight: 400;">&nbsp;within the Pali tradition. Evidence of a comparable movement into the&nbsp;</span><em style="font-weight: 400;">Ekottarika ?gama</em><span style="font-weight: 400;">&nbsp;is also available. The artificial suttas created by&nbsp;</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">subdivision&nbsp;</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">and the original suttas shared by&nbsp;</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">the&nbsp;</span><em style="font-weight: 400;">Ekottarika ?gama</em><span style="font-weight: 400;">&nbsp;and the&nbsp;</span><em style="font-weight: 400;">A?guttara Nik?ya</em><span style="font-weight: 400;">&nbsp;largely retained their original places at the beginning of each nip?ta, while the genuine suttas, probably earlier located in the&nbsp;</span><em style="font-weight: 400;">Sa?yukta ?gama</em><span style="font-weight: 400;">&nbsp;and&nbsp;</span><em style="font-weight: 400;">Madhyama ?gama</em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, were&nbsp;</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">added progressively at the end of the growing nip?ta</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> Tse-fu Kuan, Roderick S. Bucknell Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17527 Thu, 19 Mar 2020 00:00:00 +0000 'Going off the Map' https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17528 <p>The early Buddhist exegetical text, the&nbsp;<em>Nettippakara?a</em>, apparently uniquely, describes the stages of the path as ‘transcendental dependent arising’ (<em>lokuttara pa?icca-samupp?da</em>), in contrast with the twelve <em>nid?na</em>s, called ‘worldly dependent arising’ (<em>lokiya pa?icca-samupp?da</em>). A close reading of the <em>Nettippakara?a</em>in relation to another, related, exegetical text, the <em>Pe?akopadesa</em>, reveals that the latter interprets the same stages of the path in a different way. More broadly, while the <em>Pe?akopadesa&nbsp;</em>takes&nbsp;<em>pa?icca-samupp?da</em>to refer only to the twelve <em>nid?na</em>s, the&nbsp;<em>Nettippakara?a</em>’s exegetical strategy takes <em>pa?icca-samupp?da</em>to refer to an over-arching principle of conditionality, both ‘worldly’ and ‘transcendental’. This exegesis has proved popular with modern western Buddhist exegetes.&nbsp;</p> Dhivan Thomas Jones Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17528 Thu, 19 Mar 2020 00:00:00 +0000 Causation and Free Will in Early Buddhist Philosophy https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17529 <p>Free will and determinism have recently attracted the attention of Buddhist&nbsp;scholars who have defended conflicting views on this issue. I argue that there&nbsp;is no reason to think that this problem cannot arise in Buddhist philosophy,&nbsp;since there are two senses of ‘free will’ that are compatible with the doctrine&nbsp;of non-self. I propose a reconstruction of a problem of free will and determinism&nbsp;in Early Buddhism, given a) the assumption that Buddhist causation&nbsp;entails universal causal determinism, and b) a crucial passage (A I 173–175)&nbsp;suggesting that Early Buddhism is committed to the principle of alternative&nbsp;possibilities which is arguably incompatible with a determinist interpretation&nbsp;of causation. This passage suggests that Early Buddhism must leave room for&nbsp;a robust, incompatibilist form of free will, and that a conception of indeterminist&nbsp;free will in the spirit of Robert Kane’s theory allows us to make sense&nbsp;of that notion.</p> Paul Bernier Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17529 Thu, 19 Mar 2020 00:00:00 +0000 Nirv??a in Early Buddhist Inscriptions https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17531 <p>Nirv??a is often considered the quintessential goal of the Buddhist path. In this article, I focus on one aspect of the conceptualization of nirv??a that becomes apparent through an analysis of its occurrence in early Indian epigraphy. Surveying pre-Gupta inscriptions, it becomes clear that the aspiration for nirv??a has one recurring feature attached to it; the aspiration of the donor for the attainment of nirv??a — whether for themselves or others — occurs when the donation is connected in some way or another to the relics or figural or non-figural representations of the historical Buddha. This suggests that the idea of being in the Buddha’s presence grew in importance in relation to the efficacy of religious practice in this period. The same ideas can be seen emerging in the later canonical P?li Apad?na, and connect to developments in the emergence of Mah?y?na.</p> Alice Collett Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17531 Thu, 19 Mar 2020 00:00:00 +0000 The Application of Traditional Rules of Purity (Qinggui) in Contemporary Taiwanese Monasteries https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17532 <p class="Abstract"><em>Vinaya</em> rules embody the ideal of how Buddhists should regulate their daily lives, and monastics are required to observe them, despite the fact that they were compiled nearly 2,500 years ago in India: a context dramatically different not only from Chinese Buddhism's present monastic conditions, but from its historical conditions. Against this backdrop, rules of purity (<em>qinggui</em>) were gradually formulated by Chinese masters in medieval times to supplement and adapt <em>vinaya</em> rules to China's cultural ethos and to specific local Chinese contexts. This study explores how the traditional <em>qinggui</em> are applied by the Buddhist <em>sa?gha</em><em>&nbsp;</em>in present-day Taiwan, and contrasts modern monastics' opinions on these rules and their relation to early Buddhist <em>vinaya</em>, on the one hand, against classical Chan literature (such as <em>Chanyuan qinggui</em>)<em>&nbsp;</em>and the Buddhist canon (such as <em>Dharmaguptakavinaya</em>), on the other. This comparison fills a notable gap in the existing literature.</p> Tzu-Lung Chiu Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17532 Thu, 19 Mar 2020 00:00:00 +0000 <i>Theravada Traditions: Buddhist Ritual Cultures in Contemporary Southeast Asia and Sri Lanka</i>, by John Clifford Holt https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17533 <p><em>Theravada Traditions: Buddhist Ritual Cultures in Contemporary Southeast Asia and Sri Lanka</em>, by John Clifford Holt. University of Hawai’i Press. 2017. 391pp. Hb. $68, ISBN-13: 978-0-82486-780-5.</p> Elizabeth J. Harris Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17533 Thu, 19 Mar 2020 00:00:00 +0000 <i>Le Théâtre Ache Lhamo, Jeux et Enjeux d’Une Tradition Tibétaine</i>, by Isabelle Henrion-Dourcy https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17534 <p><em>Le Théâtre Ache Lhamo, Jeux et Enjeux d’Une Tradition Tibétaine</em>, by Isabelle Henrion-Dourcy, Mélanges Chinois et Bouddhiques, vol. 33. Peeters, 2017. 940pp. French. ISBN-13: 978-90-429-3339-2. Pb. €115.</p> Kati Fitzgerald Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17534 Thu, 19 Mar 2020 00:00:00 +0000 <i>Dispelling the Darkness: A Jesuit’s Quest for the Soul of Tibet</i>, by Donal S. Lopez Jr. and Thupten Jinpa https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17535 <p><em>Dispelling the Darkness: A Jesuit’s Quest for the Soul of Tibet</em>, by Donal S. Lopez Jr. and Thupten Jinpa. Harvard University Press, 2017. 320 pp. Hb and e-book. £23.95. ISBN- 13: 9780674659704.</p> Lucia Galli Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17535 Thu, 19 Mar 2020 00:00:00 +0000 Book review: Buddhist Spiritual Practices by Fiordalis https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17536 Dhivan Thomas Jones Copyright (c) 2020 Equinox Publishing Ltd. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/17536 Thu, 19 Mar 2020 00:00:00 +0000