Buddhist Studies Review https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR <p><em>Buddhist Studies Review</em> is published by Equinox on behalf of the <a href="http://www.ukabs.org.uk/ukabs/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">UK Association for Buddhist Studies</a>. The Association was founded in 1996 and two years later took over publication of <em>Buddhist Studies Review</em>, which had been run since 1983 by Russell Webb and Sara Boin-Webb. Membership in the Association includes a subscription to the journal among other benefits.You can join the Association through the membership pages on their website. </p> Equinox Publishing Ltd. en-US Buddhist Studies Review 0265-2897 David Seyfort Ruegg https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/23733 Jan Westerhoff Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-09-06 2022-09-06 39 1 3–9 3–9 10.1558/bsrv.23733 About Padmasambhava: Historical Narratives and Later Transformations of Guru Rinpoche, edited by Geoffrey Samuel and Jamyang Oliphant. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/23617 <p>About Padmasambhava: Historical Narratives and Later Transformations of Guru Rinpoche, edited by Geoffrey Samuel and Jamyang Oliphant. Garuda Verlag, 2020. 299 pp. Pb CHF 39,80. ISBN-13: 9783906139364.</p> Matthew T Kapstein Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-09-06 2022-09-06 39 1 141–145 141–145 10.1558/bsrv.23617 Buddhism after Mao: Negotiations, Continuities, and Reinventions, edited by Ji Zhe, Gareth Fisher, and André Laliberté. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/23619 <p>Buddhism after Mao: Negotiations, Continuities, and Reinventions, edited by Ji Zhe, Gareth Fisher, and André Laliberté. University of Hawai’i Press, 2019. 355pp. Hb. $84.00, ISBN-13: 9780824877347; Pb. $28.00, ISBN-13: 9780824888343.</p> Amandine Péronnet Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-09-06 2022-09-06 39 1 146–150 146–150 10.1558/bsrv.23619 ReOrienting Histories of Medicine: Encounters Along the Silk Roads, by Ronit Yoeli-Tlalim. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/23620 <p>ReOrienting Histories of Medicine: Encounters Along the Silk Roads, by Ronit Yoeli-Tlalim. Bloomsbury Academic, 2021. xvi+236 pp.; Hb $115.00 USD; Pb $39.95. ISBN-13: 9781472512574.</p> C Pierce Salguero Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-09-06 2022-09-06 39 1 151–153 151–153 10.1558/bsrv.23620 The Zhenzheng lun by Xuanyi: A Buddhist Apologetic Scripture of Tang China, by Thomas Jülch. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/23618 <p>The Zhenzheng lun by Xuanyi: A Buddhist Apologetic Scripture of Tang China, by Thomas Jülch. Routledge. 2019. VII-216. Hb $140. ISBN-13: 9780367182854.</p> Nelson Landry Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-09-06 2022-09-06 39 1 154–157 154–157 10.1558/bsrv.23618 Superiority Conceit in Buddhist Traditions: A Historical Perspective, by Bhikkhu Analayo. https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/23616 <p>Superiority Conceit in Buddhist Traditions: A Historical Perspective, by Bhikkhu Analayo. Wisdom Publications, 2021. 184pp. Hb. $24.95, ISBN-13: 9781614297192; Ebook $12.99, ISBN-10:1614297193.</p> Chandima Gangodawila Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-09-06 2022-09-06 39 1 10.1558/bsrv.23616 Editorial https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/23615 Alice Collett Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-09-06 2022-09-06 39 1 1–2 1–2 10.1558/bsrv.23615 The Significance of the Phitsanulok Dhammakaya Inscription for the Dating and Character of Boran (Ancient) Practices in Southeast Asian Theravada Buddhism https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/20824 <p>This article examines the Phitsanulok Dhammakaya inscription of 1549 and other sources for the anonymous post-canonical recitation text called Dhammakaya. It discusses the significance of their paratextual framing and the conclusions that can be drawn from it. An annotated transcription and translation of the text is provided. We argue that the inscription provides the earliest objectively verifiable date for the traditional or non-reform type of Theravada practices elsewhere called boran (ancient) practices. These practices include a specific pre-modern form of boran kammatthan (ancient meditation), Buddha image consecration and/or recitation. The article examines in some detail the context of the patronage and installation of the inscription, and includes a review of the historical evidence for this period, showing unambiguously that this form of Theravada received royal patronage in Siam during the Ayutthaya period in the sixteenth century. This is consistent with recent findings that establish its continued royal patronage in Ayutthaya and then Kandy two centuries later. The article is split into four sections: 1. the boran kammatthan context; 2. the Dhammakaya text; 3. the historical context for the inscription; 4. conclusions regarding its significance.</p> Phibul Choompolpaisal Andrew Skilton Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-09-06 2022-09-06 39 1 11–47 11–47 10.1558/bsrv.20824 Polemical Publications and Socioeconomic Shake-Ups https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/21041 <p>For the past five decades, scholarship on nineteenth century Ceylonese Buddhism has focused on the concept of “Protestant Buddhism” to describe both the development and form of the island’s Buddhist revivalism. Different critiques of this concept have provided alternative explanations of the relationship between Sinhalese Buddhism and the realities of “modernity” in colonial Ceylon. By focusing on the oft-neglected specific developments themselves rather than on that which characterized or constituted them, this article tracks the different phases of the island’s Buddhist revival from its instigation by Migettuwatte Gunananda through its expansion by Henry Steel Olcott to its culmination by Anagarika Dharmapala. By combining insights from the writings of those involved with existing work on the period, this paper demonstrates how Dharmapala, rather than Gunananda or Olcott, drove Ceylonese Buddhist revivalism to its apex by connecting religious revival to economic upliftment during the final phases of the long nineteenth century.</p> Bhadrajee S Hewage Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-09-06 2022-09-06 39 1 49–65 49–65 10.1558/bsrv.21041 Transmission of the Milindapañha https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/18893 <p>This article re-examines speculations about school affiliation of the Milindapañha (Questions of King Milinda) and traces its presence from North West India in the early centuries CE up to Southeast Asia in the nineteenth century. As there are significant differences between the textual traditions of the Pali Text Society’s Milindapañho and the Siamese printed edition, the Milindapañh?, I will discuss the little-known textual characteristics of the Siamese recensions which were circulating in Central Siam from at least the seventeenth century. This is possible with the discovery of several Ayutthaya period Milindapañha manuscripts kept at a temple and the National Library of Thailand. By the end of the eighteenth century, at least three different recensions were circulating in Central Siam. This paper will present some of their dissimilarities as well as their probable textual lineages. The newly discovered manuscripts also partly demonstrate that the shape of the textual tradition of a text, at least for the Milindapañha in Siam, reflects a function of the textual community that preserved and transmitted it.</p> Eng Jin Ooi Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-09-06 2022-09-06 39 1 67–111 67–111 10.1558/bsrv.18893 Listening to the Theragatha https://journal.equinoxpub.com/BSR/article/view/20059 <p>In the study of Pali metres, abundant research has been conducted on the establishment of rules and taxonomy, and scanning of unscanned verses. In comparison, the stylistic aspects of metres have been somewhat neglected. When the audiences listen to verses with their ears only set for metrical rules but not also the interplay of various rhythmic patterns, they fail to fully capture the aesthetic beauty and the very philosophical messages embedded in them. Taking the verses in the Dasanipata of the Theragatha as examples, this article focuses on the stylistic interplay of rhythmic uniformity and change in the expression of core messages in a Pali poem. It aims to unveil the poets’ strategies in the use of various types of metres and prosodic elements (opening, trimetre break, caesura and cadence) to create the narrative style of each poem and draw the audiences’ attention to the Buddha’s key teachings in the verses.</p> Kam Wai Erich Tam Copyright (c) 2022 Equinox Publishing Ltd. 2022-09-06 2022-09-06 39 1 113–140 113–140 10.1558/bsrv.20059